Sealaska Heritage

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In the news:
Issue evokes trauma

By Jacob Resneck, KTOO—The sights and sounds of children being taken from their families by federal immigration agents is reopening decades-old wounds for some Alaska Natives. “When I first saw them I was just absolutely appalled,” Rosita Worl said. Worl was forcibly taken from her parents at the age of 6. 

Advocacy
Stop Border Separations

I want to express my appreciation to Sen. Lisa Murkowski for opposing the separation of families at the U.S. border and demanding an immediate halt to this “cruel, tragic” practice. For me and for many, many other Alaska Natives, this issue is personal and resurrects old wounds.

Education Conference
Culture in Schools

SHI will sponsor its second education conference for teachers and administrators in an effort to promote culturally responsive pedagogy in schools. SHI’s first cultural education conference drew 140 educators from as far away as Nome and Fairbanks. Travel scholarships available. (Conference Webpage)

Latseen Hoop Camp
Register

SHI will sponsor a Latseen Hoop Camp in Juneau for students entering grades 6-12. Sealaska Heritage developed the model for this program, which teaches basketball skills and the Tlingit four core cultural values. Space is limited. Registration deadline: June 1. 

2017 HIGHLIGHTS @ SHI
VIDEO, BOOKLET

See highlights of Sealaska Heritage Institute's activities in 2017 including an art auction, new children's books, exhibits and more! (Booklet)

Careers
Job Opportunity

Opportunities: SHI is seeking an assistant retail manager, a retail sales associate, and an art youth instructor in Angoon. 

BLOG
CELEBRATION: DAY 3

Throughout the third and fourth day of Celebration 2018, dance group leaders spoke of the biennial event as a time of renewal, using their moments at the microphone to share words of support, encouragement, and healing with the hundreds of people gathered in Centennial Hall, and thousands more viewers watching the broadcast. 

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CELEBRATION: DAY 2

Only a few children attended the first Celebration in 1982, and Elders worried that the culture might not survive. But in recent years the presence of youth has become one of the most visible and vibrant elements of Sealaska Heritage’s biennial dance and culture festival,.

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CELEBRATION: DAY 1

Thirty-six years after the first Celebration was held in Juneau at the urging of Elders, representatives of the Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian people gathered on stage at Centennial Hall Wednesday evening to welcome thousands of dancers and visitors...

Celebration 2018
Food winners announced

Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) has announced the winners of its traditional food contests, held as part of Celebration 2018. The judges rated the entries on taste, color, smell and freshness. 

JURIED ART COMPETITIONS
WINNERS ANNOUNCED

Ten artists have taken top prizes and honorable mentions at Sealaska Heritage Institute’s ninth biennial Juried Art Show and Competition, and 13 young artists also placed in SHI’s second biennial Juried Youth Juried Art Exhibit. Haida artist Ariane Xay Kuyaas won Best of Show and Best of Endangered Division for her spruce root basket.

 

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Photos: Frontlet Workshop

Sealaska Heritage recently organized a frontlet carving workshop led by Ray Watkins as part of its Haa Latseen Community Project. Check out the photos to see the work created by the students at Gajaa Hít!

NEW EXHIBIT
PLACE NAMES, INVENTIONS

Sealaska Heritage Institute in 2018 opened a new exhibit, Our Grandparents’ Names on the Land, which explores ancient place names and the innovative inventions that were used to catch halibut and salmon. (NewsStory)

Celebration 2018
YOUTH EXHIBIT TO OPEN

(Flyer) SHI will open its Juried Youth Art Exhibit next week and announce winners during Celebration 2018. The exhibit will showcase 30 Northwest Coast art-inspired pieces by 25 young artists from 9 communities. The level of detail and sophistication in some of the pieces is a beautiful thing to see, said SHI President Rosita Worl.

Celebration 2018
ART SHOW UNVEILING

SHI next week will unveil pieces chosen by jurors for its ninth biennial Juried Art Show and Competition, which will include more than 40 works by nearly 30 artists. First held in 2002, the show has evolved into a highly competitive event featuring exquisite pieces that would make the old masters proud.

In the news:
Juneau wins medal

By Adelyn Baxter, KTOO—The Native Youth Olympics wrapped in Anchorage on Saturday, with Juneau athletes setting new personal records and placing in one event. It’s the first team from Juneau to compete at the statewide competition in almost 30 years. Juneau sent 10 athletes. 

In the news:
New Exhibit

By Kevin Gullufsen, Juneau Empire—On a drive from the Mendenhall Valley to downtown Juneau, one would pass the “Hand of Moldy Top” and the “Beautifully Adorned Face” before arriving at the “Trails Above Each Other.” 

BABY RAVEN READS
REVIEW

By David James, Fairbanks Daily News-Miner—Baby Raven Reads is a program launched in 2014 by the Sealaska Heritage Institute to improve the academic performance of Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian students in Southeast Alaska...(Buy)

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Blood quantum

In this edition of Q&A, SHI President Rosita Worl responds to the question: "I feel connected to my Tlingit heritage but am only 1/8 Native by blood quantum. What does this mean for me?"

RESULTS IN!
TRADITIONAL GAMES

The 2018 Traditional Games, held in late March in Juneau, were a big success, with more than 50 athletes registered and well over 100 spectators in attendance. Medals were awarded to Middle School Division and High School/Open Adult (18+) Division.

collections
basket donation

Byron and Toni Mallott of Juneau have donated a basket made by master Haida weaver Delores Churchill to Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) for its ethnographic collection. The basket, named “Half Head of Salmon Berry,” is an exquisite piece...(more)

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ART OF BABY RAVEN READS

Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast (a blog about books)—Last week over at Kirkus, I talked here with Dr. Rosita Worl, President of Sealaska Heritage in Juneau, about Baby Raven Reads, its groundbreaking, culturally-based program promoting early literacy and school readiness for Alaska Native children. 

donation
canoe replica

Sitka’s tribal government has donated to Sealaska Heritage a small replica of a full-size dugout canoe carved there through a project co-sponsored by SHI last year. The replica is a near copy of the 27-foot traditional dugout. 

cultural appropriation
worl gives talk

The line between cultural appropriation and cross-cultural communication can be difficult for educators to figure out, acknowledged SHI President Rosita Worl in a presentation to art teachers, artists, and school administrators at the Walter Soboleff Building in March.

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