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Blog

SHI publishes a blog about programs and events and other items of cultural interest.


Press Releases

Cultural education conference to kick off next week  (5-25-17)
U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, Lt. Governor Byron Mallott, to address attendees

SHI releases Beginning Tlingit Workbook  (5-24-17)
Volume extension of Dauenhauers’ landmark work

SHI receives grant to conserve, scan, old T’aḵdeintaan box drum  (5-2-17)
Infrared scans to unveil original formline design

SHI to sponsor spruce-root weaving mentor-apprentice program  (4-25-17)
Program part of effort to revitalize endangered art forms, establish Northwest Coast art capital

SHI, PITAAS, to sponsor free lecture, performances, by Ed Littlefield  (4-5-17)

Study reveals 10,000 years of genetic continuity in northwest North America  (4-4-17)

Education conference keynotes to include big names in education  (3-28-17)
SHI accepting proposals for breakout sessions presentations

SHI to sponsor cultural orientation series for educators (3-22-17)

SHI to host first culturally responsive education conference (3-20-17)
Free event for educators to be held June 1-3 in Juneau

Five teams chosen for Haa Shuká Language Project  (3-8-17)

SHI recruiting spruce-root weaving apprentices  (3-8-17)
Mentor-apprentice program part of effort to revitalize endangered art forms

SHI to showcase Native fashion at Tináa Art Auction (3-1-17)
Institute now accepting entries from designers

Miss Alaska USA 2017 named SHI Cultural Ambassador (2-21-17)
London to raise awareness about Southeast Alaska Native cultures on public platform

SHI to showcase Northwest Coast masterworks at second art auction (2-14-17)
Program part of effort to perpetuate Native languages, arts, education

SHI chooses three Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian artists to make posts (2-7-17)
Pieces to be cast in bronze, displayed in front of Walter Soboleff Building

Rising stars in language revitalization spearhead new language committee (1-30-17)

Native groups rally against proposed homelessness ordinance  (1-19-17)

SHI opens application period for Haa Shuká Community Language Learning Project  (1-10-17)

SHI to accept applications for college, voc-tech Sealaska scholarships  (12-12-16)
Institute offering cash incentive to early birds

SHI to release five new children’s books on creation stories, alphabet at public reception  (12-7-16)
Author, illustrators to sign copies

SHI to release six children’s books on creation stories, colors, alphabet  (11-29-16)
Illustrator to sign copies of first book on Friday

SHI to open statewide Native mask exhibit highlighting ancient, current uses  (11-28-16)

SHI, Sealaska to sponsor lectures on Tlingit, Navajo code talkers (11-18-16)
Event part of Native American Heritage Month

SHI signs landmark agreement with IAIA, UAS to advance Northwest Coast art  (11-17-16)

Lecture on armored warriors rescheduled  (11-15-16)
Lecture part of SHI’s Native American Heritage Month celebration

SHI releases first Tlingit language podcast (11-10-16)

SHI to open doors to all local second-grade students for arts initiative  (11-9-16)
Program part of partnership with Kennedy Center, local groups

SHI to sponsor veterans panel, film screening on Thursday  (11-7-16)
Event part of Native American Heritage Month

Sealaska, SHI to honor traditional warriors, Native veterans for Native American Heritage Month  (10-26-16)
Annual lecture series to kick off next week

SHI publishes book of rare photos documenting Inupiat life in early 1900s  (10-25-16)
Book compiled, edited by Inupiat photographer’s granddaughter

SHI to sponsor lecture on Yup’ik ways of dancing (10-24-16)

SHI releases new study on definition of “Alaska Native” (10-17-16)
Study focuses on eligibility of future generations of Natives to hunt marine mammals

SHI receives large grant to revitalize Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian languages (9-12-16)
SHI to establish new language committee to guide effort

Assistant professor, language advocate, chosen for Judson Brown scholarship (9-1-16)

SHI releases first Tlingit language and games apps (8-29-16)

Feds recognize Indian Point as historic place (8-16-16)

SHI to sponsor lecture on Alaska Native Identity study by visiting scholars (6-15-16)

SHI’S inaugural fashion show highlights traditional and contemporary Native art (6-11-16)

Soapberry, seaweed contest winners announced (6-10-16)

SHI announces winners of Juried Art Competition, Youth Art Exhibit (6-7-10)

Celebration 2016 to kick off next week (5-31-16)

What’s new: Celebration to include fashion show, youth art exhibit, & more (5-31-16)
New Walter Soboleff Building to host some events

SHI to unveil winners of juried art competition, youth art exhibit and to feature exemplary pieces (5-31-16)

SHI to host internationally-known Irish dance group at Celebration (5-31-16)
Effort part of institute’s cross-cultural understanding outreach

SHI releases Baby Raven Reads books for children (5-23-16)
Books mark first three of eighteen volumes for literacy program

SHI to receive national arts grant for art training (5-9-16)
Award slated to fund workshops for inmates, low-income residents

Visiting scholars seek paid participants for a study at SHI on Alaska Native identity (4-19-16)
Study scheduled for May and June in Juneau

Legacy to continue in partnership (4-8-16)
ANAF to gift assets to Sealaska Heritage Institute

SHI to sponsor lecture on indigenous intellectual property rights  (4-6-16)
Lecture is second of two by SHI Visiting Scholar Jacob Adams

SHI to sponsor lecture on injustices, inequities in Native education (3-14-16)

SHI to sponsor Native Fashion Show during Celebration (2-22-16)

SHI to sponsor lecture on indigenous intellectual property rights (2-22-16)

SHI, PITAAS, to sponsor free performance by Byron Nicholai  (2-9-16)

Dugout canoe project to kick off in Sitka  (2-8-16)
Project aims to document, perpetuate, endangered practice of canoe making

Sealaska Heritage accepting applications for new Juried Art Youth Exhibit (2-4-16)
Awards will be used to purchase art supplies for schools

Renowned physician, researcher, to speak on far-reaching effects of childhood trauma  (2-1-16)

SHI welcomes visiting scholar from Norway (1-19-16)
Research to focus on indigenous intellectual property rights

SHI, state library, to sponsor lecture on de Laguna (12-30-15)

SHI accepting applications for college, voc-tech Sealaska scholarships (12-23-15)
Institute offering cash incentive to early birds

SHI to hold homecoming ceremony for sacred Chilkat robe (11-25-15)
Public invited to attend

SHI accepting applications for revamped Juried Art Show, Competition (11-19-15)
SHI also to sponsor exhibit of youth art

SHI acquires sacred Chilkat robe on ebay (11-18-15)
Seller takes loss to send robe home

SHI joins forces with Any Given Child, local groups, in arts initiative (11-16-15)
Elementary students to make annual arts excursion to Walter Soboleff Building

SHI to sponsor workshop on art and math (11-12-15)
Educators in Juneau, Hoonah, Angoon and Hydaburg eligible to apply

Sealaska, SHI to sponsor retrospective for Dr. Walter Soboleff Day (11-10-15)
SHI seeking copies of letters penned by Soboleff

SHI to co-sponsor art, Tsimshian classes (10-26-15)

SHI to sponsor lectures, discussions for Native American Heritage Month, Walter Soboleff Day (10-26-15)

Federal investigators find in favor of complaint filed by SHI (10-20-15)
East Coast school subject to repatriation law

SHI's work featured in 50 humanities projects that have shaped the country (9-29-15)

Brothers donate significant writings, photos to SHI archives (9-3-15)
Donation includes letters written by archives' namesake

SHI to sponsor formline design classes at prison with master artist (8-21-15)
Teacher to lead Tsimshian immersion classes in the evenings

SHI to sponsor two lectures in August (8-3-15)

SHI releases formline design curriculum and art kit, shares with schools (7-27-15)

New traveling exhibition on Native concepts of health and illness opens (7-8-15)

SHI to sponsor annual Latseen Hoop Camp (7-6-15)
Camp to feature Hoop Time AAU Coach Bob Saviers

SHI petitions feds to investigate sale of Native objects by East Coast school (6-26-15)

SHI to sponsor lecture on Native place names that feature cedar (6-22-15)

SHI to sponsor lecture on repatriation of headdress by visiting scholar (6-17-15)

Hoonah student chosen for Judson Brown scholarship (6-11-15)

Grand opening of Walter Soboleff Building to kick off this week (5-11-15)
Event to be broadcast, streamed online live

SHI to sponsor math and culture academy (4-14-15)
Institute accepting applications through April 30

SHI to sponsor family night for Baby Raven Reads (4-2-15)

SHI to sponsor Latseen Leadership Academy (3-31-15)

SHI chooses apprentices to help make, install monumental glass piece (2-26-15)

SHI to partner with Department of Interior on move to new building (2-24-15)
Move to begin this week

SHI to sponsor first family night for Baby Raven Reads (2-18-15)

SHI launches program to teach literacy skills through the arts (1-21-15)

SHI accepting applications for college, voc-tech scholarships (1-6-15)

SHI to sponsor lectures for Native American Heritage Month (10-30-14)

Archives facility to be named for Tlingit hero William L. Paul, Sr. (10-15-14)

Totems to be raised at Gajaa Hit in Juneau (9-22-14)
Community invited to attend

New cultural building to showcase dramatic masterpieces by Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian artists (9-15-14)

SHI to sponsor lecture on climate change, effect on Native cultures (9-10-14)

Foundation buys sacred object at Paris auction, donates to SHI (9-2-14)
Staff stunned by turn of events

Congressman Young continues to seek resolution for traditional Alaska Native artwork containing bird parts (7-23-14)
Young bill would recognize subsistence needs and allow sale of handicrafts

SHI to sponsor annual Latseen Hoop Camp (7-14-14)

Winners of Juried Art Competition announced (6-11-14)

Sealaska Heritage Institute releases children's book (6-9-14)
Author to do book signing, storytelling during Celebration

Celebration to kick off next week (6-5-14)

SHI to unveil pieces accepted for Juried Art Show (6-4-14)
Awards to be announced next week

SHI hires new art director (4-19-14)

SHI seeking teachers, artists for Jinéit Art Academy (4-14-14)
Teams to create formline teaching kits for schools

SHI to sponsor Latseen Leadership Academy (4-7-14)
Institute accepting applications through May 16

SHI to sponsor lecture on new research on ancient herring populations (3-31-14)

SHI extends deadline for Juried Art Show and Competition (3-5-14)

SHI accepting applications for juried art competition (2-19-14)
New category for 2D formline design added

SHI chooses mentor-apprentice teams to revitalize Tlingit language (1-21-14)
Institute to train teams in Juneau this week

SHI to sponsor skin-sewing workshops in five communities (1-14-14)

SHI accepting applications for college, voc-tech scholarships (12-31-13)
Institute offering cash incentive to early birds

SHI to sponsor workshop on formline in Anchorage (12-19-13)
Workshop result of demand from Anchorage shareholders

SHI's first art auction attracts huge names in Northwest Coast art (12-17-13)
Tickets, table sponsorships now available for event

SHI to sponsor lectures for Native American Heritage Month (10-29-13)
November series will focus on spirituality

Doyon makes award for Walter Soboleff Center (10-26-13)

SHI awarded $454,828 grant toward revitalizing the Tlingit language (9-12-13)

Collector buys, donates old Haida hat to SHI (9-2-13)

SHI chooses artists to carve totem poles, screen (8-26-13)

SHI to hold public viewing at Santa Fe Indian Market (8-6-13)
Alaska Native ethnographic collection to be displayed, explained

SHI to break ground on the Walter Soboleff Center Thursday (7-31-13)

National cruise foundation makes award for Soboleff center (7-29-13)

SHI awarded grants to commission new totem poles, screen in Juneau (7-24-13)
Institute accepting proposals from Native artists

SHI to break ground on Walter Soboleff Center (7-17-13)

SHI hires general contractor to build Walter Soboleff Center (7-1-13)
Project to break ground in July

Cruise Industry Charitable Foundation grants SHI $75,000 for Walter Soboleff Center (6-13-13)

SHI to sponsor math and culture academy (6-12-13)
Students will learn math through Native art

SHI to showcase Northwest Coast masterpieces at first art auction (5-28-13)
Program effort to make Juneau center for Northwest Coast art

Artplace makes award to fund Walter Soboleff Center, art (5-20-13)

Individuals, club make significant donations to center (5-7-13)

SHI to sponsor Native artist market (4-29-13)
Tables available for reservation now

SHI to sponsor Latseen Leadership Academy (4-8-13)
Institute accepting applications through May 3

Murdock makes award to fund Walter Soboleff Center (4-2-13)

SHI to sponsor skin-sewing workshops (3-1-13)
First class scheduled next week

Rasmuson awards grant for media equipment to SHI (2-25-13)

SHI a finalist for extremely competitive ArtPlace grant (1-17-13)

SHI to hold formline workshops regionwide (1-8-13)

SHI accepting applications for college, voc-tech scholarships (1-7-13)
Institute offering cash incentive to early birds

Eagle totem to be raised at University of Alaska Southeast (04-12-10)
Eagle to balance Raven totem

Artists chosen to carve Eagle totem pole for Sealaska Heritage Institute, UAS (5-6-09)

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News Stories About Sealaska Heritage

Opinion: Return Native American objects to their rightful home
By Russell Thornton
Newsweek
How ironic that a Massachusetts theological school has not returned a sacred fishhook to the Tlingit Indians of Southeast Alaska! Christian missionaries took the object from the Tlingit in the 19th century.  The halibut fishhook, carved with the form of a wolf, is one of 158 Native American objects in the possession of the Andover Newton Theological School in Newton, Massachusetts, but stored in the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem...(more) (5-23-17)

‘I am Tlingit’: Miss Alaska brings Tlingit culture to national stage
Alyssa London wows in Tlingit robe, speaks Tlingit on national TV • London reflects on Miss USA competition, top-10 finish
By Alex McCarthy
Forty-eight hours after she wore a Tlingit-inspired robe and a flowing red evening gown on national television, Alyssa London wore a gray zip-up hoodie and black leggings, sitting on a gravelly hill near the Mendenhall Glacier. London, the first person of Tlingit descent to be crowned Miss Alaska USA, finished in the top 10 at the Miss USA competition last Sunday and was in Juneau two days later on her way back to her home in Anchorage...(more) (5-19-17)

More evidence of Original Peoples of Turtle Island
By Jim Windle
Two Row Times (Israel)
The Haaretz News out of Israel recently published a report that would indicate humans have been in what is today known as the Americas, as far back as 100,000 to 150,000 years. The article is entitled “Native Americans Have Actually Been There Since the Beginning, Say Archaeologists” written by Elizabeth Sloane. In it, she builds a case from archaeology and oral history. “Oral histories are usually considered fabulous. Now ancient skeletons and a genetic study proves that the Tlingit and Haida tribes’ oral history of being there from the beginning is based on fact,” writes Sloane...(more) (5-17-17)

Can Native research codes avoid culture clash?
The San people of southern Africa seek to encourage mutually beneficial collaborations with scientists with an official code of research ethics. Can lessons from past conflicts help bypass future battles?
By Charlie Wood
The Christian Science Monitor
Knowledge is power, and the San people want to wield it as such.
In March, the long-studied San people joined other indigenous groups in asking that scientific study be a two-way street, carrying benefits back to their communities as it shares their information with the world. Such guidelines seek to bridge the divide between scientific pragmatism and traditional values, in hopes of making painful legal battles a thing of the past. More than ten distinct nations spread across five countries make up the San, an indigenous people of southern Africa who have drawn ample scientific attention for their genetic diversity, botanical knowledge, and unique linguistic consonants. But decades of sustained research traffic through their communities has created a culture clash…(more) (5-16-17)

Miss Alaska stuns with transforming, Tlingit-style robe at Miss USA pageant
By Tamara Ikenberg
Alaska Dispatch News
Traditional Tlingit formline design and high fashion merged in Miss Alaska Alyssa London's Miss USA evening gown. London, a top 10 finalist in the pageant held last weekend in Las Vegas, walked onstage wearing a robe based on Tlingit regalia draped over her shoulders, then threw back the garment to reveal her red, Swarovski crystal-beaded evening gown. The material of the robe became the dress's long train....(more) (5-1517)

The Seminary and the Wanted Relics
A New England seminary about to merge with Yale University is under fire over Native American relics in its collection—part of a long history of mistreatment
By Candida Moss
The Daily Beast
In Newton, Mass, a struggling seminary is coming under attack this week for failing to return religious artifacts in its collection to the Native American tribes to which they belong. Andover Newton Theological School possesses a collection of 158 Native American artifacts that, for roughly 70 years, have been housed at the nearby Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass. In 2015, when Andover was attempting to raise funds to cover a shortfall in enrollment, the institution attempted to sell the artifacts. This, they soon learned, would violate the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA); the federal law governing the return of sacred items to tribes that produced them. As of last week, Andover Newton had not complied with federal requests that they produce and send inventories of their holdings to Native American tribes…(more) (5-14-17)

US warns Newton seminary over native artifacts
By Malcolm Gay
Boston Globe
Federal officials have again warned the Andover Newton Theological School over its failure to comply with a law that governs the return of cultural objects deemed sacred to Native American or native Hawaiian peoples. At issue is a collection of roughly 160 Native American and native Hawaiian objects the school has housed at the Peabody Essex Museum since the late 1940s. The collection was largely unknown to tribal leaders until about two years ago, when PEM director Dan Monroe warned them the Newton seminary planned to sell roughly 80 of the collection’s most valuable objects...(more) (5-12-17)

With help of infrared photography, institute hopes to repair timeworn Tlingit drum
By Tamara Ikenberg
A timeworn Tlingit shaman's box drum dating back to at least the late 1800s may get new life. The nonprofit organization Museums Alaska just granted Sealaska $3,868 to get the repatriated object in exhibit-worthy condition and have it scanned by an infrared photographer. The leader of the T'akdeintaan Clan loaned the instrument to the Sealaska Heritage Institute in Juneau in 2016. "It's a very old piece that is deteriorating so the clan is interested in putting it in a facility like ours that can look after it," said Sealaska History and Culture Director Chuck Smythe, who added the drum is most likely made of red or yellow cedar....(more) (5-11-17)

Rep. David Eastman Censured By Peers Over ‘Abortion Vacation’ Remark
Abortion remark aimed at Alaska Native women gets David Eastman a slap on the wrist
By Frank Hopper
Indian Country Today
In a 25 to 14 vote, members of the Alaska House of Representatives voted yesterday to censure one of their own, Rep. David Eastman (R. Wasilla), for comments he made disparaging women in Alaskan villages. In an Associated Press interview on May 2, Eastman alleged poor women in rural Alaskan villages will get pregnant so they can become eligible for Medicaid-paid trips to Anchorage or Seattle to receive abortions...(more) (5-11-17)

Perspectives, sashes, and crowns with Miss Alaska
By Richard Perry
Anchorage Press
You may have heard Alyssa London was recently crowned Miss Alaska USA. She has had local, state, and national level public appearances. Several days ago, London traveled to Las Vegas, Nevada for the Miss USA competition. The event is May 14 and will be the 66th Miss USA pageant. Her schedule has been noticeably busy....(more) (5-11-17)

New Yale Partner Faulted for Handling of Tribal Artifacts
By Leslie MacMillan and Tom Mashbergmay
New York Times
A 210-year-old seminary here that is in the process of joining Yale Divinity School is coming under fire from federal regulators for failing to follow a law designed to ensure the return of sacred and other special artifacts to Native American tribes. The Newton Andover Theological School has a collection of 158 Native American items, including locks of hair, wampum belts, “peace pipes” and finely beaded ceremonial garb, mostly gathered in the 19th century by Christian missionaries. For about 70 years, the artifacts have been housed at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass....(more) (5-10-17)

Eastman reaches new low
By Rosita Worl
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Rep. David Eastman, R-Wasilla, owes an apology to his legislative colleagues and other Alaskans over his repugnant statements that some Alaskans are glad to become pregnant, so that they can have a Medicaid-funded trip to Anchorage or Seattle to have an abortion...(more) (5-9-17)

Cultural landscape conference focuses on Native education
By Ed Schoenfeld
CoastAlaska News
Teachers from around Southeast Alaska will gather in Juneau next month to discuss culturally responsive education. A conference called Our Cultural Landscape will focus on helping educators better teach Native students.
Jackie Kookesh is education director of the Sealaska Heritage Institute, which is organizing the event. “We think that teachers, when they understand, they begin to understand they’re a part of the cultural landscape here as well. Then they get grounded. And I think it provides a shift for educators to look at their relationship as a teacher in the classroom,” she said. The conference is June 1-3 and is open to teachers, administrators, classroom aides and those working in early childhood education...(more) (APRN) (5-4-17)

Genetic Continuity Study Backs Up Oral Histories
Study Revealing 10,000 Years of Genetic Continuity Supports Oral Histories
By Alexander Ewen
Indian Country Today
A new scientific report has shown genetic links between ancient skeletons found in Alaska and British Columbia and the Indigenous Peoples who live in the area today. According to co-author Rosita Worl, a member of the Tlingit nation and president of the Sealaska Heritage Institute, the study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on April 4 shows that “our ancestral lineage stems from the first initial peopling of the region” and that “science is corroborating our oral histories"...(more) (4-25-17)

Native Americans Have Actually Been There Since the Beginning, Say Archaeologists
Oral histories are usually considered fabulous. Now ancient skeletons and a genetic study proves that the Tlingit and Haida tribes' oral history of being there from the beginning is based on fact
By Elizabeth Sloane
Haaretz (Israel)
Native Tribes of the Pacific Northwest region of the United States and Canada have oral traditions going back time immemorial, that place them in the region from the beginning. Now a genetic study of ancient skeletons and existing tribes shows that the unwritten history was apparently just so. Rosita Worl, president of the Sealaska Heritage Institute in Juneau and a member of the Tlingit tribe, says that the Tlingit and Tsimshian tribes migrated west along British Columbia’s Naas River to the coast, before spreading north and south...(more) (4-28-17)

A musical line stretching through time
By Mary Catharine Martin | Capital City Weekly
How do you define “music?”
That’s something Ed Littlefield thought about for six months as part of an undergraduate class, it’s something he’s been thinking about since, and it’s a question he posed to the attendees at an April 21 “Art of Place” lecture on “Tlingit Music — Past, Present and Future"...( more) (4-26-17)

A skeleton found in a cave reveals a 10,000-year-old Native link to Southeast Alaska
By Yereth Rosen
Alaska Dispatch News
The indigenous people of Southeast Alaska and British Columbia have a tradition of invoking their longevity in that region as going back to a time before memory. Now DNA evidence backs up that claim, and gives more specifics about how far back the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian people can trace their ancestry. Analysis of genetic material from the remains of an ancient skeleton shows links with Northwest Native people that go back more than 10,000 years. "It confirms our oral tradition that we have lived and occupied and owned Southeast Alaska since time immemorial," said Rosita Worl, a Tlingit anthropologist and president of the Sealaska Heritage Institute, a nonprofit dedicated to preserving the Native cultures of Southeast Alaska…(more) (4-17-17)

DNA Study Reveals Genealogy of Ancient Alaskan Remains
By David DeMarPosted
New Historian
A DNA study of ancient remains found in a cave in Alaska has revealed that the ancient Native American tribes living in the region today are directly related, revealing how long the locale has been inhabited. According to Science Online, human remains from On Your Knees Cave, dated to around 10,300 years old, were found to be closely related to a trio of ancient skeletons found along the Canadian coast of British Columbia. In turn, these three ancient individuals hold close relation to the Haida, Nisga’a and Tlingit tribes that inhabit the region today, revealing a direct line of descent to these tribes...(more) (4-9-17)

Remains reveal 10,000-year-old connection to Southeast Natives
By Aaron Bolton
KSTK News
The oral tradition of Southeast Alaska’s Tlingit and Haida people says they’ve lived in the region since time immemorial. Now, there’s evidence connecting present-day Southeast Native groups to 10,300-year-old skeletal remains found on Prince of Wales Island. That’s according to a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences...(more) (4-6-17)

Study reveals 10,000 years of genetic continuity in northwest North America
Archaelogical News
A study of the DNA in ancient skeletal remains adds to the evidence that indigenous groups living today in southern Alaska and the western coast of British Columbia are descendants of the first humans to make their home in northwest North America more than 10,000 years ago...( more) (4-6-17)

Nuclear DNA Study Suggests Genetic Continuity in North America
Archaeology
According to a report in Science Magazine, a study of nuclear DNA suggests that Native American and First Nations groups living in southern Alaska and the western coast of British Columbia are descendants of people who lived in the region some 10,000 years ago. An earlier study of mitochondrial DNA, which is passed along the maternal line, failed to find a link between the 10,300-year-old skeleton known as Shuká Káa, or “Man Ahead of Us,” and members of the Tlingit tribe that now live near On Your Knees Cave, where the remains were discovered...(more) (4-6-17)

Local indigenous groups related to the first inhabitants of northwest North America
UPI
According to new genetic analysis, the indigenous peoples of southern Alaska and the west coast of British Columbia are direct descendants of the first human inhabitants of northwestern North America. "Our analysis suggests that this is the same population living in this part of the world over time, so we have genetic continuity from 10,000 years ago to the present," Ripan Malhi, an anthropology professor at the University of Illinois, said in a news release...(more) (4-6-17)

These Indigenous Alaskan Groups Are Linked to the First Humans to Settle in Northwest America
10,000 years of genetic continuity
Science Alert
New DNA evidence from ancient skeletal remains suggests that the indigenous groups of southern Alaska and the west coast of British Columbia, Canada are descendants of the first humans to settle in northwest North America more than 10,000 years ago. The finding is based on the remains of an Alaskan individual known as Shuká Káa, who's estimated to have lived around 10,300 years ago, and contributes to a growing body of evidence that reveals the complex population history of these early American peoples...(more) (4-5-17)

Ancient Skeleton Reveals 10,000-Year Link To Modern Tribes In Pacific Northwest
By Kristy Hamilton
IFL Science
A man by the name of Shuká Káa (Tlingit for “Man Ahead of Us”) has helped fill in an ancient archeological blank thousands of years in the making. As it turns out, the modern-day indigenous peoples in southern Alaska and the western coast of British Columbia are the descendants of the first people to make the region their home more than 10,000 years ago. The study is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences...(more) (4-4-17)

America's First Immigrants: DNA Links Native Americans, Indigenous Canadians To First Ancient Migration
By Elana Glowatz
International Business Times
DNA proves that Native American and indigenous Canadian groups along the northern Pacific Ocean have been living there for more than 10,000 years.
Scientists did a genetic analysis on people from the British Columbia coast and southern Alaska and compared it with samples from ancient skeletons to show the connection to the humans who first settled North America, according to a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences...( more) (4-4-17)

Ancient skeletons show direct link to modern tribes in the Pacific Northwest
By Ann Gibbons
Science
The Native Americans of the Pacific Northwest have always claimed to have deep roots in the region. Now, an ancient mariner may be able to back that claim up. Scientists sequencing the DNA of 10,300-year-old human remains from On Your Knees Cave in Alaska have found that he was closely related to three ancient skeletons found along the coast of British Columbia in Canada. These three ancient people were in turn closely related to the Tsimshian, Tlingit, Nisga’a, and Haida tribes living in the region today. The new finding reveals a direct line of descent to these tribes, and it shows—for the first time from ancient DNA—that at least two different groups of people were living in North America more than 10,000 years ago...(more) (4/5/17)

Alaska's indigenous Tlingit people are descendants of the first humans to settle in northwest America more than 10,000 years ago, DNA study reveals
By Cecile Borkhataria
Daily Mail
Indigenous groups living today in southern Alaska and the western coast of British Columbia are descendants of the first humans to make their homes in northwest America more than 10,000 years ago. The researchers looked at genetic data from Shuká Káa (Tlingit for 'Man Before Us'), an ancient individual whose remains - found in a cave in southeastern Alaska - date to about 10,300 years ago. DNA found in ancient remains adds to the body of evidence that indigenous groups have lived in these areas for a long time. ...(more) (4-4-17)

Longtime leader Rosita Worl to leave Sealaska board
By Ed Schoenfeld
CoastAlaska News
One of the Sealaska regional Native corporation’s longest-serving leaders is stepping down. Rosita Worl has spent 30 years on the Juneau-based corporation’s board of directors. She said she’s been thinking about leaving for a while. “I probably would have resigned three years ago, but at that point in time, I was chair of the Lands Legislation (Committee) and I felt like I wanted to see that completed before I left the board,” she said...(more) ( U.S. News & World Report) (APRN) (Miami Herald) (Juneau Empire) (The Wichita Eagle) (3-22-17)

Travel and Culture: Alaska- Juneau Art Walk continued
By Cornelia Seckel
Art Times Journal
I signed up for an Art Walk courtesy of the Juneau Arts and Humanities Council. Offered on Sunday thru Wednesday during “season” it is an excellent way to, in a matter of several hours, get an overview of the arts in Juneau. The tour potentially stops at about 32 galleries, public art displays and studios...Here are more highlights from our walk...(more) (10-16-17)

Five Things You Didn’t Realize Were Funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities
By Erin Blakemore
Smithsonian.com
In 1963, a group of university presidents, professors, art experts, businesspeople and even the chairman of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission came together to form a national commission. Their goal: study the state of the humanities in the United States. Their leader: Brown University president Barnaby Keeney. Their charge: report findings and recommendations on how to proceed to three sponsoring bodies: the American Council of Learned Societies, the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States and the United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa...(more) (3-15-17)

Sealaska Heritage Institute picks three young Native artists for project
By Leila Kheiry
KRBD-Ketchikan
Three young Alaska Native artists, including one from Ketchikan and one from Hydaburg, have been chosen to carve cedar house posts that will be cast in bronze and displayed in front of the Walter Soboleff Building in Juneau...(more) ( KTOO) (3-15-17)

Miss Alaska USA Alyssa London, Tlingit a Voice for Her Culture
Alyssa London discusses using her platform to bring awareness to issues affecting Native youth
By Richard Walker
Indian Country Today
Alyssa (Yáx̱Ádi Yádi) London, Tlingit, had been Miss Alaska USA for eight days and she had already been presented with regalia and named a cultural ambassador by Sealaska Heritage Institute, interviewed on television, traveled to New York City for Fashion Week, and was getting ready to head to Washington, D.C. to speak at an National Congress of American Indians youth summit. “It’s really a whirlwind,” London said. “Once you get crowned, your life really changes in a big way.” She expected, and wanted, nothing less. “I realize with this platform that I can do so much for our Alaska Native and American Indian youth,” she said. “It’s a platform that brings a lot of awareness to hot-button issues in Indian country. I’m able to be a voice for that”...(more) (3-8-17)

Fabulous photos lift account of early 20th-century Alaska village life
By David A. James
We Alaskans
The black-and-white photograph is striking. At a distance and in its center, a hunting crew carries an umiaq (skin boat) up a shore. Three children run behind it, a lone man stands farther off silently watching, while in the foreground dogs take only scant notice. Beyond that, we can discern nothing. Most of the picture is a blanket of white and it is impossible to determine what is snow, beach, ocean, nearby hills or sky. It all merges into vast emptiness. The emptiness perfectly captures the when and where of the picture...(more) (3-5-17)

Miss Alaska USA 2017 named SHI Cultural Ambassador
www.missuniverse.com
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) has named the new Miss Alaska USA 2017, Alyssa London, as a cultural ambassador in an effort to further its mission to perpetuate and enhance Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian cultures and to promote cross-cultural understanding...(more) (2-21-17)

SHI to showcase Northwest Coast masterworks at second art auction
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) will showcase contemporary masterpieces of Northwest Coast art at its second art auction in an effort to perpetuate critical programs such as Native language revitalization and workshops on endangered Native art forms. Funds from the proceeds will build SHI’s new endowment to ensure art, language and education programs live long into the future, especially in this era of uncertain fiscal times, said SHI President Rosita Worl. The auction is also part of SHI’s effort to make Juneau the Northwest Coast art capital of the world, she said...(more) (2-22-17)

Sealaska summer camp registration
JUNEAU EMPIRE
The application period is now open for several Sealaska Heritage Institute camps and workshops for young adults. Opening the Box: Middle School Math and Culture Academy runs June 10 to 20 for students entering grades six through eight...(more) (2-22-17)

Miss Alaska USA 2017 named SHI Cultural Ambassador: London to raise awareness about Southeast Alaska Native cultures on public platform
Alaska Business Monthly
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) has named the new Miss Alaska USA 2017, Alyssa London, as a cultural ambassador in an effort to further its mission to perpetuate and enhance Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian cultures and to promote cross-cultural understanding....(more) (2-21-17)

Miss Alaska 2017 talks Tlingit heritage and digital entrepreneurship
For 27-year-old Alyssa London, Miss USA competition is a chance to bring Alaska Native culture to national audience
By Kevin Gullufsen
JUNEAU EMPIRE
She’s a Tlingit Eagle of the Killerwhale clan and a digital advertising expert, a Stanford grad, former Microsoft marketing wiz and entrepreneur. This year’s Miss Alaska USA, 27-year-old Alyssa London is as comfortable in the boardroom as she is in a floatplane, flying between Southeast’s villages to promote the region’s indigenous artists. Crowned Feb. 4 and named a Sealaska Heritage Institute cultural ambassador on Friday, the Empire spoke with London Saturday about pageantry, leadership and how she reconciles her Native heritage with a digital world...(more) (Capital City Weekly)(2-20-17)

SHI chooses three Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian artists to make posts
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) has chosen three emerging, master Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian artists to carve three cedar house posts that will be cast into bronze. The project is a part of SHI’s ongoing effort to make Juneau the Northwest Coast art capital of the world...(more) (2-16-16)

Sealaska offers skin sewing workshop
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute is offering a skin-sewing workshop with Louise Kadinger. It’ll happen on Friday, Feb. 24, 6-8 p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 25, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Sunday March 4, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Limited to 15 participants. $100 fee covers three-day class and materials. Register by Feb. 17 at 4 p.m...(more) (2-16-17)

Rising stars in language revitalization spearhead new language committee
Capital City Weekly
The first meeting of Sealaska Heritage Institute’s Southeast Regional Language Committee began late January with traditional introductions by the committee’s three members: Lance Twitchell, who spoke in Lingít (Tlingit language), Gavin Hudson, who spoke in Sm’algyax (Tsimshian language), and Benjamin Young, who spoke in Xaad Kíl (Haida language). Hearing the three young men express themselves in Southeast Alaska’s indigenous languages was an uplifting way to begin, said SHI President Rosita Worl. “It is like music to my ears to hear you speak,” Worl said. “It is so wonderful. (Tlingit elders) Dr. Soboleff and Clarence Jackson would be so happy to hear the voices of our ancestors speaking at this time”...(more) (2-8-17)

Language Revitalization Stars Spearhead New Committee
Indian Country Today
Sealaska Heritage Institute’s Southeast Regional Language Committee met for the first time on January 27, and began the meeting with traditional introductions by the committee’s three members: Lance Twitchell, who spoke in Lingít (Tlingit language), Gavin Hudson, who spoke in Sm’algya̱x (Tsimshian language), and Benjamin Young, who spoke in Xaad Kíl (Haida language). Hearing them express themselves in Southeast Alaska’s indigenous languages was an uplifting way to begin, said SHI President Rosita Worl...(more) (2-6-17)

Dictionary of Sm’algyax now online
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) has posted its Dictionary of Shm’algyack (Tsimshian) online free of charge. The move is an effort to make language resources as accessible as possible, especially to those students who are revitalizing the language. Compiled by Donna May Roberts with assistance from the elders of Metlakatla...(more) (2-1-17)

Native Language Dictionary Added to Sealaska’s Free Offerings
SHI now has links to Tsimshian, Tlingit, and Haida dictionaries
Indian Country Today
In an effort to make Native language resources as accessible as possible, Sealaska Heritage Institute has posted its Dictionary of Shm’algyack (Tsimshian) online free of charge. SHI especially wants these resources available to those students who are helping to revitalize the language and speaking it on the land...(more) (1-28-17)

At Governor’s Awards, Alaska’s artists worry about Trump’s proposed cuts to the NEA
By James Brooks
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Gov. Bill Walker and almost a quarter of the Alaska Legislature attended Thursday night’s Governor’s Awards for the Arts and Humanities, but the most popular person might have been someone who wasn’t there — President Donald Trump. As Alaska’s arts luminaries accepted the state’s top honors, speaker after speaker emphasized the importance of the arts and urged those in attendance to speak against cuts proposed to federally funded arts organizations....(more) (1-29-7)

Four Native institutions urge Juneau Assembly to abandon ‘camping’ ordinance
By Jeremy Hsieh
KTOO
The heads of four Juneau-based Alaska Native institutions are urging the Juneau Assembly to abandon its proposal to make camping downtown a ticketable offense. The proposed ordinance targets the some of the homeless people who sleep in storefront nooks. It has the support of the Juneau Police Chief Bryce Johnson and some store owners. Mayor Ken Koelsch had the ordinance drafted. In a letter to the Juneau Assembly, the leaders say removing campers from downtown district can be done in “a humane and compassionate” way by establishing a campsite elsewhere...( more) (1-19-17)

Applications period open for Haa Shuká Project
Capital City Weekly
METLAKATLA, HYDABURG, SITKA, JUNEAU — Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) has opened the application period for its Haa Shuká Community Language Learning Project, a new program designed to help revitalize the languages of the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian in four Southeast Alaska communities: Metlakatla, Hydaburg, Sitka and Juneau. Applications will be accepted through Feb. 10, 2017...(more) (1-18-17)

Photo: Voices on the land
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
David Katzeek shares information from a traditional cultural perspective to about 50 sixth-grade students from Dzantik’i Heeni Middle School on Friday as part of the Voices of the Land project in the clan house at the Walter Soboleff Building. Through the program, Voices on the Land, Sealaska Heritage Institute is integrating performing arts and digital storytelling into six Juneau schools over three years through artists in residence, digital storytelling and a teacher training academy...(more) (1-16-17)

Applications period open for Haa Shuká Community Language Learning Project
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) has opened the application period for its Haa Shuká Community Language Learning Project, a new program designed to help revitalize the languages of the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian in four Southeast Alaska communities: Metlakatla, Hydaburg, Sitka and Juneau. Applications will be accepted through Feb. 10, 2017. The project will pair fluent speakers of Lingít (Tlingit), Xaad Kíl (Haida) and Sm’algyax (Tsimshian) with intermediate and advanced speakers in those languages to increase learner proficiency...(more) (1-15-17)

Skin sewing workshop
Capital City Weekly
Louise Kadinger will teach a skin-sewing workshop at the end of January. It will incorporate the use of sea otter hide, which is open, in accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act, only to Alaska Natives with at least 1/4 Native blood quantum and with a copy of their Certificate of Indian Blood issued by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, or Tribal I.D. card issued by a federally recognized Alaska Native Tribe...(more) (1-4-17)

Top 10 things that we talked about at the water cooler in 2016
By Tripp Crouse
KTOO
It’s the end of the year and that means we’re looking back at KTOO’s most popular stories. For 2016, we’re keeping the list to stories KTOO produced with specific ties to Juneau. Some serial stories are lumped into one entry...Celebrating diversity: Our Facebook Live coverage of Celebration in June tops the charts in regards to reach and engagement. Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian dance groups converged on Juneau to kick off Celebration 2016...Blood lines: A study released in October by the Sealaska Heritage Institute tackled how the regulatory definition of blood quantum applies to marine mammal hunters...(more) (1-2-17)

The Year in News: A look back at Juneau's biggest stories of 2016
By LISA PHU 
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Here’s a list of Juneau stories and issues — in no particular order — that shocked us, had a lasting impact or celebrated our community...Celebration 2016 in June saw two new events that will hopefully become mainstays during the biennial festival of Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian cultures...( more) (1-2-17)

Bright moments of 2016
Capital City Weekly
From the editor: We’ve reached out to members of the arts community around Southeast Alaska for their thoughts on the year’s “bright moments” in arts and culture. From the dedication of Xunaa Shuká Hít to Juneau-Douglas Little Theatre’s “5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche,” read on to learn about some of the year’s highlights...( more) (12-28-16)

Dance, Art and Song
Sealaska Heritage Institute highlights Tlingit, Tsimshian and Haida culture in its biennial Celebration
By Steve Quinn
Indian Country Today
When David Boxley struck his deer-hide drum, it was time to celebrate. And with that, more than 2,000 people danced, sang and enjoyed a reunion among nearly 50 groups who had traveled anywhere from one mile to 1,000 miles—just to dance. They came to Juneau, Alaska, from within the state, from neighboring British Columbia and the Yukon Territory, and from Washington. Most were of Tlingit, Tsimshian and Haida descent, and they have arrived every two years since 1982 for a chance to perform on two stages and on Juneau’s streets. The event, held every other year, is called simply Celebration, and it is the state’s largest cultural Native event....(more) (12-22-16)

Children’s books for a Native worldview
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
Not so long ago, children’s books with an authentic focus on Alaska Native stories and culture were harder to find. That’s changing with Baby Raven Reads, a Sealaska Heritage Institute program focusing on children up to age five. Dec. 10, SHI released five new children’s books “that reflect the Native worldview;” it aims, said SHI Chief of Operations Lee Kadinger, to publish 18, and to distribute the books to libraries around Southeast Alaska. Through social media, they’ve even had a request from Europe that the books be translated into French...(more) (Juneau Empire) (12-14-16)

SHI offering cash incentive to early bird scholarship applicants
Capital City Weekly
The enrollment period for Sealaska scholarship applications will open on Dec. 15 for the 2017-2018 school year. The deadline to apply is March 1, 2017. However, Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) is offering a $50 incentive to those who complete their scholarship application on or before Feb. 1 and who are accepted as scholarship recipients; if selected as a recipient, the $50 will be included in their scholarship award...(more) (Juneau Empire) (12-14-16)

Respected Chilkat and Ravenstail weaver Clarissa Rizal dies at 60
By Scott Burton
KTOO
“The world has lost another luminary.” That’s how the Sealaska Heritage Institute began a message announcing the death of Clarissa Rizal at age 60, a renowned Chilkat and Ravenstail weaver. She was a Raven of the T’akdeintaan Clan, also known as the black-legged Kittywake Clan. The institute’s announcement says Native people owe her a debt for teaching and reviving the sacred art...(more) (12-7-16)

Renowned Chilkat weaver Clarissa Rizal dies of cancer
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
Renowned Chilkat and Ravenstail weaver Clarissa Rizal, a Raven of the T’akdeintaan, died Wednesday after a battle with cancer. Rizal apprenticed with Jennie Thlunaut, a weaver from Klukwan. She began her apprenticeship when Thlunaut was 95 years old. After Thlunaut’s death, Rizal was so grieved she was unable to weave; she began again when she was asked to teach Thlunaut’s granddaughters. “Not so long ago, we were in danger of losing the knowledge on how to make our sacred Chilkat weavings,” said a Sealaska Heritage Institute Facebook post about Rizal’s death. “We as Native people owe a debt of gratitude to Clarissa for mastering our sacred art traditions and for teaching others to weave”...(more) (Capital City Weekly) (12-7-16)

Tlingit men trained hard to become warriors
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
No matter the season, every day from age six began the same way for a young K’inéix Kwáan man training to be a warrior in pre-contact Yakutat — by wading into the ocean and staying as long as he could without passing out. “This was environmental training,” Kai Monture, a Tlingit and Eyak member of the Yéil house of the K’inéix Kwáan, or Copper River clan, told an audience in the clan house of the Walter Soboleff Building Nov. 29. “We spend half our lives on the water anyway, for subsistence. And because raiding was such a big aspect of Tlingit warfare, especially by sea, conditioning to water was a really big aspect of Tlingit warrior training"...(more) (12-7-16)

SHI releases six children’s books on creation stories, colors, alphabet
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) released six culturally-based children’s books that reflect the Native worldview as part of its Baby Raven Reads, a program for Alaska Native families with children up to age 5 that promotes language development and school readiness.
The series includes a three-book set derived from ancient creation stories that have been passed from generation to generation for thousands of years. The set includes “Raven and the Box of Daylight,” “Raven Brings Us Fire,” and “Origins of Rivers and Streams.” The books were adapted from oral histories by Pauline Duncan and illustrated by Lindsay Carron...(more) (12-7-16)

Terrifying visages: Native armor inspired fear in foes
By Ed Schoenfeld
CoastAlaska News
Tlingit battle helmets were designed to inspire fear. The thick, wooden head armor carried imagery of strong warriors, fierce animals or revered ancestors. But helmets also played a ceremonial role, representing clans or helping shamans scout behind enemy lines....(more) (12-2-16)

Sealaska Heritage Institute to release 6 children’s books
Indian Country Today
As part of its Baby Raven Reads program, Sealaska Heritage Institute will release six culturally-based children’s books that reflect the Native worldview. Included is a three-book set derived from ancient creation stories that have been passed down from generation to generation for thousands of years. The set includes Raven and the Box of Daylight, Raven Brings us Fire, and Origins of Rivers and Streams...( more) (12-1-16)

Downtown Gallery Walk ushers in holiday season
By Mary Catharine Martin
JUNEAU EMPIRE
It’s the most wonderful time of the year, and Gallery Walk — the biggest, most popular First Friday of the year — is a festive way to usher in the season. One of the biggest arts events of the year, this year’s Gallery Walk downtown will feature events new and old. Among those in the “new” category is a free preview of a mask exhibit at Sealaska Heritage Institute. If you don’t catch it this weekend, you’ll have to wait until May to see it again. Sealaska will also host multiple dance groups...(more) (Capital City Weekly) (11-30-16)

SHI opens state-wide Native mask exhibit highlighting ancient, current uses
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) has opened a new exhibit featuring Native masks from across the state that elucidates the masks’ ancient and current uses. The exhibit, Alaska Native Masks: Art & Ceremony, includes 50 masks from the Iñupiat, Yup’ik, Alutiiq, Athabascan, Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian and is on display in the Nathan Jackson Gallery at the Walter Soboleff Building in Juneau. SHI will open the display to the public on Friday, Dec. 2, during Gallery Walk, said SHI President Rosita Worl, noting the exhibit is part of SHI’s advocacy to promote Alaska Native arts, cultures, history and education statewide. ...(more) (Juneau Empire) (11-30-16)

SHI, UAS and IAIA partner to offer Northwest Coast art education
By Maria Dudza
KRBD
Sealaska Heritage Institute has partnered with the Institute of American Indian Arts and the University of Alaska Southeast to provide enhanced and expanded Northwest Coast art programs and opportunities for Alaska students. The three organizations signed a memorandum of agreement last Wednesday that will be used to design and implement a formal education plan. “It’s part of a broader effort to really highlight Northwest Coast art, and to really make it something that’s attractive, that people want to come to Alaska to see,” said Rosita Worl, president of Sealaska Heritage Institute. “In order to do that, we need to make sure we have practicing artists”...(more) (11-28-16)

Talking in code: How the Tlingit, Navajo tribes helped end WWII
By Clara Miller
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Thirty-three Native American tribes had members who served as World War II code talkers, amounting between 400-500 men. But for decades, it was classified information and kept secret, even from the code talkers’ families. For the Tlingits, it wasn’t until 2013 that it became public knowledge. They had a huge impact and the outcome of the war might have been vastly different without them, said Ozzie Sheakley, a member of the Southeast Alaska Native Veterans Association, in a phone interview...(more) (Capital City Weekly) (11-25-16)

SHI, IAIA, UAS to advance Northwest Coast art
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) has entered into a three-way partnership with the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA), and the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) to provide enhanced and expanded Northwest Coast (NWC) art programs and opportunities for Alaska students. Dr. Robert Martin, President of the Institute of American Indian Arts and a member of the Cherokee Nation, said that IAIA currently has an average of 10 Alaska Native students enrolled per semester, out of around 475, and he is hoping to see that number triple. “We’ve had a long history of Alaska Native students in IAIA and this is going to give us an opportunity to increase those numbers dramatically,” Martin said...(more) (Juneau Empire) (11-23-26)

Native wartime code talkers are subject of upcoming SHI lecture
By Tripp J Crouse
KTOO
During World War II, the U.S. armed forces utilized Native languages as a way to transmit indecipherable messages in the Pacific Theater. It was a code the Japanese were never able to break, and it’s credited with saving the lives of thousands of troops. The Sealaska Heritage Institute is hosting a series of noon lectures honoring Native warriors — past and present...( more) (11-22-16)

Sealaska sponsors lecture of code talkers
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute and Sealaska will sponsor two free lectures on Tlingit and Navajo code talkers this week in celebration of Native American Heritage Month. Starting at noon on Tuesday, Nov. 22, at the at the Walter Soboleff Building, the lectures will feature Southeast Alaska Native Veterans Commander Ozzie Sheakley and Judith Avila, author of the best-selling book “Code Talker: The First and Only Memoir by One of the Original Navajo Code Talkers of WWII"...( more) (11-20-16)

Rare photos documenting Inupiat life in the early 1900s published by SHI
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute has published a book of old, rare and priceless photographs of Inupiat life in the early twentieth century made by an Inupiat photographer and teacher.
The book, “Menadelook: An Inupiat Teacher’s Photographs of Alaska Village Life, 1907-1932,” showcases nearly one hundred photographs by Inupiat Charles Menadelook that document life in Kingigin (Wales) in the Bering Strait between Alaska and Russia. The book, which was compiled and written by Menadelook’s granddaughter, provides a singular view into the Inupiat world during the early twentieth century and gives both a pictorial and Native perspective on Inupiat traditions and historical events, said SHI President Rosita Worl, noting the book stems from SHI’s advocacy program, which is part of SHI’s effort to promote Alaska Native arts, cultures, history and education statewide...( more) (Juneau Empire) (11-16-16)

SHI to open doors to all local second-grade students for arts initiative
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) this month will open the Walter Soboleff Building to all second-grade students in Juneau as part of a national program to expose children to the arts. The event is part of the Ensuring the Arts for Any Given Child program, which was founded by the Kennedy Center to create equitable access to arts education programs and resources for K-8 students. The Kennedy Center works with 20 sites in the country, and Juneau was selected as the eleventh site in 2013...(more) (11-16-16)

Study: Proportion of Alaska Natives allowed to hunt marine mammals decreases
By Mike Dunham
Alaska Dispatch News
At the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention in Fairbanks last month, Sealaska Heritage Institute presented a study addressing the possibility of changing the definition of "Alaska Native" with regard to taking marine mammals for food or art purposes.
"Determination of Alaska Native Status Under the Marine Mammal Protection Act" was prepared by the institute's maritime anthropologist, Steve J. Langdon, with funding from several Native corporate and nonprofit groups. A news release from the institute said it "brings to light data that might alarm some sectors of the Native community, because findings indicate among other things that the proportion of the Alaska Native population becoming ineligible to hunt marine mammals under current agency enforcement policies is rising at an accelerating rate"...(more) (11-14-16)

On eve of Veteran's Day, 'Native Warriors' honored
Sen. Sullivan, panel of Native Vietnam vets speak at film showing
By Sam DeGrave
JUNEAU EMPIRE
It has been more than five decades since Fred Bennett and 27 other young men left Hoonah, headed for the jungles of Vietnam. Like many of his peers, Bennett had never left his village at the time. He hardly knew why the U.S. was fighting a war half a world away. But that didn’t stop Bennett and thousands of other Alaska Natives and American Indians from enlisting. According to the Department of Veteran Affairs, more than 42,000 Native Americans fought in Vietnam, a fact U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan, R-Alaska, referred to as “a special kind of patriotism” Thursday....(more) (11-11-16)

Baby Raven Reads to host drum making workshop
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute’s Baby Raven Reads program will be hosting a drum making workshop at Dzantik’i Heeni Middle School’s commons on Sunday, Nov. 20 from 2-3:30 p.m. Families with Alaska Native children age 5 and under are invited to join. Space is limited so registration is required...(more) (Juneau Empire) (11-9-16)

Blood lines: Sealaska studies Alaska Native descendant dilemma
By Rashah McChesney
KTOO
What makes a person Alaska Native? In some places, a regulatory definition — known as blood quantum — has superseded cultural ones.  And a new study by the Sealaska Heritage Institute in Juneau tackles how that regulatory definition applies to marine mammal hunters...( more) ( APRN) (Pechanga) (11-15-16)

Native Artisans Worry Ivory Bans in Other States Could Reverberate in Alaska
By Davis Hovey
KNOM
In June, the Federal government instituted a near-total ban on the domestic commercial trade of African elephant ivory, but many Alaskans are concerned the backlash from this ban is affecting other ivories. St. Lawrence Islander Susie Silook is the author of a petition to protect walrus ivory and other marine mammal by-products from various states’ legislation that would see it banned as a response to the federal ban...( more) (KTVA) (10-27-16)

African Ivory Ban Hurting Alaska Artists
By Julie St. Louis
Courthouse News Service
A U.S. senator from Alaska called a field Senate committee hearing regarding the federal ban on ivory from African elephants, which Alaska Natives say is confusing tourists and having a "chilling effect" on their legal use of walrus, mammoth and mastodon ivory products in art. Sen. Dan Sullivan convened the field hearing of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works Subcommittee on Fishers, Water and Wildlife during the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention on Oct. 21...(more) (10-25-16)

Sealaska to honor warriors, veterans for Native American Heritage Month
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute and Sealaska will honor traditional Native warriors and veterans at the institute’s annual lecture series to celebrate Native American Heritage Month. The lectures will be held from noon-1 p.m. in Shuká Hít (the clan house) at the Walter Soboleff Building. The talks also will be videotaped and posted online. This year’s series will feature a panel discussion on Tlingit and Native American code talkers and lectures on traditional warrior training and Tlingit and Haida armor and weapons...(more) (Juneau Empire) (  Pechanga) (10-26-16)

SHI to hold lecture on Yup’ik ways of dancing
Capital City Weekly
The Sealaska Heritage Institute will hold a lecture by a professor from University of Alaska Fairbanks on Yup’ik ways of dancing at noon on Thursday, Oct. 27, in the Living History Center at the Walter Soboleff Building. The talk by Dr. Theresa Arevgaq John, an associate professor of Indigenous studies at UAF, is titled “Yuraryaraput Kangiit-llu: Our Ways of Dance and Their Meanings"...(more) (Juneau Empire) (10-26-16)

SHI releases new study on definiton of ‘Alaska Native’
Capital City Weekly
The Sealaska Heritage Institute has released a statewide study on the current definition of “Alaska Native” and how the rule could affect future generations of Natives who want to hunt marine mammals. The definition under the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) allows only Natives with 1/4 blood quantum or more to hunt or use marine mammals for food or clothing and arts and crafts. The study, conducted by Maritime Anthropologist Dr. Steve Langdon through Sealaska Heritage, does not make any recommendations but rather lays out several approaches the Native community may want to consider to protect their descendants’ hunting rights...(more) (Juneau Empire) (10-26-16)

Ivory ban affects Native arts
By Kevin Baird
Fairbanks News Miner
New laws banning the sale of ivory are having a “chilling effect” on the Alaska Native arts economy, Sen. Dan Sullivan said. Sullivan convened the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works Subcommittee on Fisheries, Water and Wildlife for a field hearing Thursday afternoon during the Alaska Native Federation Convention at the Carlson Center...Rosita Worl, who is president of Sealaska Heritage Institute, was the first to testify at the hearing...(more) (10-21-16)

Study: Changing population dynamics could impact the future of marine mammal hunting
By Molly Dischner
The Bristol Bay Times
A new study indicates that who can hunt marine mammals may change in the future under the current definition of "Alaska Native." A Sealaska Heritage Institute study released earlier this month suggests that the way the Marine Mammal Protection Act is currently written, which only allows Alaska Natives who are at least one-quarter native to hunt or use marine mammals for food or clothing and arts and crafts, could become problematic in the future. Those originally enrolled as Alaska Native under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act are also eligible under the act...( more) (10-21-16)

New Study on Definition of "Alaska Native" Released
Study focuses on eligibility of future generations of Natives to hunt marine mammals
SITNews
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) has released a statewide study on the current definition of "Alaska Native" and how the rule could affect future generations of Natives who want to hunt marine mammals...(more) (10-18-16)

From cracked log to dugout canoe
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
In February of this year, the red cedar log carver Steve Brown and his apprentices were working with was full of cracks. By the end of early October it had blossomed into a successful dugout canoe. Sealaska Heritage President Rosita Worl said the tree strikes her as a symbol of Tlingit culture. “It’s not just canoe carving. It symbolizes our culture, all the things that are important to us as a people. Transportation, movement of our people within the region, the gathering of food,” Worl said. “At one point in time, our culture, we stood tall, firm and strong— and then we had some difficulties that came with the changes that came to our society, and that log had many problems…. Other people might have given up, but under the instruction from Steve Brown they continued"...(more) (10-12-16)

Canoe steaming carries on Tlingit and Haida tradition
By Emily Russell
KCAW News
To transform a hollowed-out log into a dugout canoe requires more than expert carving — it requires steam, and lots of it. Earlier this week the skies over Eagle Beach in Sitka were filled with smoke and steam, as a carving team worked to transform a cedar dugout into an elegant, seaworthy canoe...( more) (KTOO) (10-6-16)

Preserving a scar: Seward statue debate exposes differing views on history
By James Books
JUNEAU EMPIRE
It’s far from a whale of controversy, but a statue proposed for a plaza in front of the Alaska Capitol is causing some discomfort by literally putting a 19th century imperialist on a pedestal. Last week, KTOO-TV in conjunction with the Alaska Historical Society hosted a panel of historians to discuss a statue of William Henry Seward and the legacy of the Secretary of State who negotiated and executed the Alaska Purchase...( more) (9-27-16)

SHI program trains educators to see Thru the Cultural Lens
By Quinton Chandler, KTOO
Juneau teachers and administrators were the students on Saturday at a Sealaska Heritage Institute seminar intended to help them see the world from their pupils’ perspectives. It’s part of an ongoing series called Thru the Cultural Lens in which educators learn about Southeast Alaska Native culture and history. Saturday, they gave presentations on 10,000 years of education in Southeast Alaska...(more) (9-27-16)

Sealaska Heritage Institute Receives Language Revitalization Grant
Indian Country Today
Sealaska Heritage Institute has received a federal grant to revitalize the languages of the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian in four Southeast Alaska communities. The $927,000 grant from the Administration for Native Americans will fund four mentor-apprentice teams of Lingít (Tlingit), Xaad Kíl (Haida), and Sm’algyax (Tsimshian) speakers and students in Metlakatla, Hydaburg, Sitka, and Juneau to study the languages over three years...(more) (9-19-16)

Sealaska Heritage Institute Releases Tlingit Language and Games Apps
Indian Country Today
Learning Tlingit just got a little bit easier—Sealaska Heritage Institute recently released a Tlingit Learning app and a Tlingit Language Games app, both available on iPhone and Android devices. The language app includes 300 Tlingit words, phrases, and sounds, and the games app teaches Tlingit words for ocean animals and birds through interactive games, said SHI President Rosita Worl in a press release...(more) (9-13-16)

Grant funds expansion of 3-year language revitalization program — and ‘a whole different worldview’
By Lakeidra Chavis
KTOO
The Sealaska Heritage Institute has received a roughly $930,000 federal grant from the Administration for Native Americans to establish a three-year language revitalization program. Rosita Worl, the nonprofit’s president, said the new program will be an extension of an existing one. “We just completed three years of a master-apprentice program, which we viewed as very successful,” Worl said. “We really wanted to continue it, and also expand it to Haida and Tsimshian"...( more) (Fairbanks News Miner) (Pechanga) (9-12-16)

SHI receives nearly $1M to revitalize Native languages
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute has received a large federal grant — nearly $1 million — to revitalize the languages of the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian in four Southeast Alaska communities. The $927,000 award from the Administration for Native Americans will fund four mentor-apprentice teams of Lingít (Tlingit), Xaad Kíl (Haida) and Sm’algayx (Tsimshian) speakers and students in Juneau, Sitka, Metlakatla and Hydaburg to study the languages over three years...(more) (Capital City Weekly) (9-12-16)

Tlingit linguist Lance Twitchell receives Judson L. Brown award
By Mike Dunham
Alaska Dispatch News
The Sealaska Heritage Institute has selected Lance Twitchell as the recipient of the annual Judson L. Brown Leadership Award. Twitchell, whose Tlingit name is X'unei, is an associate professor of Alaska Native languages at the University of Alaska Southeast. He was part of the group that pushed to make Alaska one of two states to officially recognize indigenous languages, the other state being Hawaii....(more) (9-8-16)

Professor, language advocate, chosen for Judson Brown Scholarship
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute through its Scholarship Committee has chosen a well-known language advocate and assistant professor of Alaska Native languages as the 2016 recipient of its annual Judson L. Brown Leadership Award. The recipient, Lance (X’unei) Twitchell, has helped to lead a high-profile effort in recent years to revitalize Alaska Native languages...(more) (Juneau Empire) (9-7-16)

Tlingit to-go: Sealaska launches language app
By Heather Hintz
KTVA
Learning a new language means starting with the basics, and Tlingit students now have a new teaching tool. The Sealaska Heritage Institute launched an app that brings sights and sounds to your cell phone. 
Shirley Kendall, a Tlingit instructor at the University of Alaska Anchorage, said it’s important to get the right pronunciations when you’re trying to take up Tlingit...( more) (9-6-16)

Haa shuká: Tlingit language apps connect past, present and future
Sealaska Heritage Institute's 'Tlingit Games' and 'Learning Tlingit' feature fluent speakers
By LISA PHU 
JUNEAU EMPIRE
A new app, Tlingit Games, brings you into the world of wildlife. Choose “Birds!” and you watch hummingbirds, kingfishers and Stellar’s Jays fly in and out of a wooded scene of other birds. Press any one of them and you hear the Tlingit pronunciation over a soundscape of bird song and calls. When you get comfortable with the Tlingit words of different birds, you can take the quiz. Beginner Tlingit speaker Alfie Price, 49, and his 17-year-old daughter Katy have been competing against each other to see who can get a higher score. “She’s been beating me pretty soundly, especially the birds,” Price said. “For some reason, I struggle with the birds"...( more) (Capital City Weekly) (9-2-16)

SHI releases first Tlingit language game app
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) has released its first Tlingit apps for students who want to learn their Native language through mobile devices. The programs include an app with more than three hundred Tlingit words, phrases and sounds and an app that teaches the Tlingit words for ocean animals and birds through interactive games, said SHI President Rosita Worl…(more) (Juneau Empire) (8-31-16)

Want to learn Tlingit? There’s a new app for that
By Lakeidra Chavis
KTOO
There are only a few hundred Tlingit speakers in the world, according to linguists and researchers. In a world where English is considered the dominant language, Tlingit is endangered, linguistically speaking. The Sealaska Heritage Institute hopes to combat that. The organization announced the release of two free apps Monday, aimed at making learning the language more accessible…(more) (Alaska Public Media) (The Daily Progress) (Webcenter 11) 8-31-16)

Collaborative Chilkat and Ravenstail robe nears completion
By Scott Burton
KTOO
A Ravenstail and Chilkat robe with more than 40 collaborators is under final assembly in Juneau. The robe will be part of the Huna Tribal House opening ceremony this Thursday in Glacier Bay National Park. Project leader, artist and weaver Clarissa Rizal organized the project and said the inspiration came from a conversation with Klawock weaver Suzi Williams...(more) (8-23-16)

Indian Point Goes on National Register of Historic Places
Indian Country Today
The 78-acre sacred X’unáxi (Indian Point) in Juneau was recently added to the National Register of Historic Places, making it the first traditional cultural property in Southeast Alaska to be placed on the register. In a press release, Sealaska Heritage Institute President Rosita Worl said that the Auk Tribe, the Alaska Native Brotherhood (ANB) and Alaska Native Sisterhood (ANS), as well as SHI, Sealaska, the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida, the Douglas Indian Association and other members of the Alaska Native community have been fending off proposed development of the area also known as Auke Cape for decades...(more) (8-18-16)

‘Little Whale’ takes readers on Tlingit canoe journey
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
More than 100 years ago, when he was just 10 years old, Roy A. Peratrovich Jr.’s grandfather, Andrew Wanamaker, traveled the 200 miles from Sitka to Ketchikan in a war canoe. He, his father, and others made the voyage to right a wrong done to one of their clan members. Now, that journey — fictionalized — is the subject of a chapter book Peratrovich wrote and illustrated for young readers, “Little Whale.” Peratrovich is the eldest son of renowned Alaska Native civil rights leaders Elizabeth and Roy Peratrovich; Andrew Wanamaker was Elizabeth Peratrovich’s adoptive father...(more) (8-17-16)

Feds designate Juneau's Indian Point as sacred, worthy of protection
A'akw Kwáan village site is added to National Register of Historic Places
By Lisa Phu
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Indian Point in Juneau has recently been added to the National Register of Historic Places due to its traditional and cultural significance. The roughly 78-acre parcel of land in Auke Bay is one of the original village sites of the A’akw Kwáan. Being listed on the register means the federal government recognizes Indian Point as a historic place worthy of protection under the National Historic Preservation Act....(more) (Capital City Weekly) (Alaska Dispatch News) (Hastings Tribune) (8-16-16)

Exploring the gray area between cultural appreciation and appropriation in Juneau
By Lisa Phu
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Juneau tattoo artist David Lang has recently seen an uptick of people wanting Alaska Native formline tattoos, something he specializes in. “I say formline rather than say, ‘I do Tlingit tattoos,’ or, ‘I do Tsimshian tattoos,’ or, ‘I do Haida tattoos,’ because I’m doing them for such a variety of people. I’m tattooing a Tlingit one day and a Tsimshian another day. And a non-Native the next…(more) (8-14-16)

In summer program, teachers get schooled in the arts: Juneau Basic Arts Institute participants demonstrate what they've learned
By Sam DeGrave
JUNEAU EMPIRE
To the beat of a deerskin drum and the tune of a Tlingit song, 16 teachers from several Alaskan communities danced into the University of Alaska Southeast classroom where they had spent the last two weeks. It was Thursday night, and the teachers — hailing from Juneau, Ketchikan and Kodiak — were both performing and celebrating. They had just completed the Juneau Basic Arts Institute, an annual summer program aimed at helping K–12 educators and administrators learn to incorporate art into their teaching on a daily basis...( more) (8-6-16)

Tlingit language apprentices graduate
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
“Lingít tundatáani.” Loosely translated, the phrase means “Tlingit perspective” or “Tlingit world view.” Asked about the last three years in Sealaska Heritage Institute’s mentor-apprentice program, Hans Chester (Naakil.aan) of Juneau said that’s what the program has given him. Yakutat apprentice Devlin Anderstrom (Shagaaw Éesh), 19, said the same, adding that his apprenticeship with Yakutat elder Lena Farkas helped provide a sense of identity...(more) (Juneau Empire) (8-3-16)

Artists, police promote community dialogue on diversity, peace
By Paula Ann Solis
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Juneau business owner Christy NaMee Eriksen said she was troubled for days after watching the most recent online videos of white officers killing black men that have reignited a national conversation on racism. “I felt like there was this national mood going on that hit us locally,” Eriksen said. “I spent a lot of days feeling very sad and very angry. I came out of that dark space and wanted to do something constructive.”...(more) (7-19-16)

How new rules could right an old wrong for Alaska Native artists
By Jill Burke
Alaska Dispatch News
A century after the passage of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the federal government is working to eliminate restrictions within the law that impinge on Alaska Native artisans' ability to sell traditional pieces adorned with feathers, beaks and other inedible bird parts. The act is one of the oldest wildlife management laws in the nation, but unlike the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Endangered Species Act, it has no exceptions for traditional American Indian or Alaska Native use...(more) (7-17-16)

Bring the Ancient One Home
By Rosita Kaaháni Worl
Indian Country Today
The threads of history, culture and ancestry form a timeless and unbreakable weave in Native American life. The elders who came before us are as relevant today as they were thousands of years ago. Their wisdom, knowledge and beliefs guide and center us, forming the fabric upon which we live our modern lives. That is why the prompt return of The Ancient One is so important to our people. Sometimes called the “Kennewick Man,” our ancestor was found in 1996 near Kennewick, Washington along the Colombia River...(more) (Alaska Dispatch News)  (Juneau Empire) (7-11-16)

Southeast Alaska Indian Culture and Wood Carvings
Wood Culture
Southeast Alaska, beginning in Ketchikan, Metlakatla, Sitka, Juneau and others, is the traditional homeland of the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian and is rich in Indian culture, wood carving and totem. Wood carving, as an art form, reflects all the Native cultures connecting with the environment. The wood materials used come from the forest and the forms usually represent animals, spirits or places…(more) (7-4-16)

In the Works with Alison Bremner
Capital City Weekly
Alison Bremner is a Tlingit artist living in Yakutat and apprenticing in the Tlingit language. She is a member of the Git-Hoan and Mount Saint Elias Dancers. She won second place for “Cat Lady” in the Best of Formline category during Celebration 2016 Juried Art Show...( more) (6-29-16)

SHI accepting applications for artists in residence
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) is accepting applications for its new artist-in-residence program at the Walter Soboleff Building in Juneau. The purpose of the program is to encourage study of Northwest Coast art practices. Artists in residence may choose from two dedicated spaces on the main floor: the Delores Churchill Artist-In-Residence Studio and the monumental art space, a dedicated area for artists creating large-size Northwest Coast art pieces...(more) (6-29-16)

Artist Residencies at Sealaska! Apply Right Now!
Indian Country Today
Art is a major component when it comes to conserving and showcasing heritage. To cultivate this vital form of cultural expression, the Sealaska Heritage Institute is looking for Native artists to participate in a new artist-in-residence program at the Walter Soboleff Building in Juneau. The program’s purpose is to encourage study of Northwest Coast art practices...(more) (6-28-16)

SHI accepting applications for gumboot camp
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute is now accepting applications for its Gumboot Camp that will run Aug. 1-5 at Harborview Elementary School. The Shaawk’ or little gumboots session for four-year-olds will be from 9 a.m.-noon and the Shaaw or gumboot session for incoming kindergarteners will run from 1-4 p.m...(more) (6-22-16)

SHI presents lecture on Native identity
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor a lecture by two visiting scholars on the preliminary results from their study on Alaska Native identity involving participants recruited largely from Juneau and Haines. The scholars, Dr. Caitlin Stern and Dr. Jessie Barker, have been conducting research in Southeast Alaska since May through SHI’s Visiting Scholars Program. As part of the program, SHI asks that scholars share their research with the community as a public service...(more) (6-15-16)

Sealaska Celebration 2016: A Tlingit Dance Group Returns After 30 Years
By Kara Briggs
Indian Country Today
Dei Shu, a Tlingit dance group—recreated from an earlier group that performed at the very first Celebration in 1982—returned in early June to this biennial festival of Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian culture with a new generation of dancers. “I want you to know that I was really proud of these kids,” the group’s elder and teacher Paulina Phillips, 84, told an audience of several hundred people in the Alaska Native Brotherhood Hall. “I was glad to see them because I was always worried we wouldn’t have anyone to pass on these songs to"...(more) (6-17-16)

Atlin dance group reflects cross-border cultural resurgence
By Ed Schoenfeld
CoastAlaska News
Southeast Alaska’s Tlingit culture doesn’t stop at the Canadian border. Tribal members also live in British Columbia to the east and the Yukon to the north. An Inland Tlingit group from up the Taku River has strong connections to Alaska...(more) (6-16-16)

Behind the bracelets: Documenting the lives of Native jewelers
By Randi Spray
Capital City Weekly
There’s a great deal of doubt involved in matching historic Native jewelers with their creations, even in cases that seem straightforward like that of a silver snuffbox owned by Rudolph Walton and emblazoned with his initials. “I kind of wonder ‘Did he make it or was it a gift?’” Zachary Jones asked during his lecture on documenting Tlingit, Haida and Tshimshian jewelers at Celebration last week...( more) (Juneau Empire) (6-15-16)

Highlights from Celebration
Capital City Weekly
Hundreds of people lined the boat landing at Douglas Harbor on Wednesday singing and chanting to welcome canoes from around Southeast to the unofficial start of Celebration organized by the One People Canoe Society. Ten canoes made the journey this year, though some had a rough time of it. “Our journey was long and wet, but we have new friends because of it!” Albert Hinchman, skipper of the Hoonah canoe, shouted to the cheering crowd as he introduced his boat...(more) (6-15-16)

What does Celebration mean to you? (From the canoe landing on Douglas on June 8th)
Capital City Weekly
It’s for the young people. That’s what the canoes are here for, the teachers are in those canoes. They are teaching our young people, because we cherish you...(more) (6-15-16)

McLean, Barr take home 1st place in subsistence foods contests
By Emily Kwong
KTOO
Celebration brings together tribal citizens from across Southeast every other year. It’s a sensory experience and two contests in particular were made for the tastebuds. Doris McLean stands before a bowl of soap berries, ripe and gleaming red. But pretty soon, with the help of a hand mixer, they turn pink and frothy, the consistency of whipped cream. McLean is something of a soapberry alchemist...( more) (6-14-16)

Runway history: Juneau's first Native Fashion Show
Show 'just the beginning' for indigenous couture in mainstream markets
By Paula Ann Solis
JUNEAU EMPIRE
A few things set Juneau’s first ever Celebration fashion show apart from ones often seen in media: the host spoke in Tlingit, a Native dancer opened the show and designs had history woven into their fabrics. But one thing was the same — the clothes were incredible...(more) (6-12-16)

To the sound of drums, 2016 Celebration comes to an end
By Liz Raines
KTVA-TV
There’s a continuous drumbeat in Juneau. A heartbeat that’s awakened a world of colorful song and ancient dance. Children and elders flood the streets, chanting and moving. The grand exit of dance groups from Centennial Hall marked the close of one of the largest gatherings of Alaska Native peoples in the state: Celebration...( more) (6-11-16)

Crunchy Goodness Rules the Day in Black Seaweed Contest at Sealaska Celebration 2016
Indian Country Today
Slightly crunchy and lightly salted characterized the winning black seaweed entry as Dora Barr took top honors at one of two traditional-food contests at Sealaska Celebration 2016.
Barr came in first place, with second and third places going to Roberta Revey and Ivan Williams, respectively. Prizewinners got $500, $250 and $100 for first, second and third place...(more) (6-11-16)

Soapberry Contest Offers Flashbacks to Delicious Days Gone By at Sealaska Celebration 2016
Indian Country Today
For Leonilei Abbott, it was a flashback to childhood, when her mother, Helen Watkins, would whip up a batch of her favorite treat. “She always made it fun,” said Abbott after sampling the sweet-sour soapberry froth that contestants had created onstage in the competition dedicated to Watkins. “She would smash the soapberries up first, then add just tiny bit of water, and she’d start whipping it, then she’d add just a little bit of sugar, and sometimes some berries or bananas or both, and just whip it all up"...(more) (6-11-16)

Slideshow: Celebration 2016 Native Fashion Show
JUNEAU EMPIRE
(6-10-16)

Slideshow: Celebration, day 2
JUNEAU EMPIRE
(6-10-16)

Whip it! Bitter berries transform into whipped dessert at Celebration
Three contestants, three different methods at Soapberry contest; Sealaska Heritage Institute dedicates event to late Helen Watkins
By Lisa Phu
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Francis Neumann used to whip soapberries into a light, airy meringue with a wooden stick. Now, she uses a handheld mixer. She made the shift “when I could afford it,” Neumann said laughing. Neumann was one of three contestants for this year’s Celebration 2016 Soapberry Contest at the Juneau Arts & Culture Center Friday. Her competition was her sister Doris McLean and her cousin Charlene Baker — all three are from Whitehorse...(more) (6-10-16)

Native art market huge hit at Celebration
By Sam DeGrave
JUNEAU EMPIRE
It’s difficult to walk through downtown Juneau right now without running into somebody toting bags filled with recently purchased furs, jewelry, beads, drums, blankets or boxes. If the gift bags weren’t sign enough, the 14 artist booths set up at Sealaska Plaza make it clear that the Northwest Coast Art Market is back. Having returned after its first Celebration two years ago, the market drew 45 artists from Southeast Alaska, Washington and even Canada to Juneau. Artists are set up in 39 booths, split between the Sealaska Plaza and the Juneau Arts & Culture Center...(more) (6-10-16)

Sealaska Art Contest Winners Shine in Creativity, Imagination
Indian Country Today
Eight artists have taken top prizes at Sealaska Heritage Institute’s eighth biennial Juried Art Show and Competition, and five young artists also placed in SHI’s new Youth Juried Art Exhibit. Tsimshian artist David R. Boxley won the top two awards: Best of Show and Best of Formline for his piece Txaamsem. “I have worked for a very long time to understand formline,” Boxley told the crowd at the ceremony. “I believe it is the most beautiful thing in the world.” Tlingit artist Alison Bremner won second place for Best of Formline for her print Cat Lady...(more) (6-10-16)

Young Artists Hit It Out of the Park in Sealaska Heritage Institute’s Celebration Contest
Indian Country Today
Sealaska Heritage Institute’s Celebration 2016 included an art contest for the youngest of artists, and their works were easily on a par with those of their adult counterparts. The Juried Youth Art Exhibit included 34 objects made by 28 individual young artists, plus one artwork made by 61 sixth-grade students from Dzantik’I Heeni Middle School in Juneau. The group piece, Warrior armor and helmet, won first place in the middle school division, and The Fox by Tessa Williams of Gustavus won second place...(more) (6-10-16)

Art Beat: Irish dancers join Celebration
By Mike Dunham
Alaska Dispatch News
The biennial Juneau festival known simply as Celebration is underway. Southeast Alaska art, language, culture, food, etc. are part of the big event — so big that it's crowded the Legislature out of the capital for a week. Six thousand people are in town for the four-day fete, including 2,000 dancers in 50 dance groups from around Alaska, Canada and the Lower 48...(more) (6-10-16)

Weaving: 'A very powerful way of life'
At Celebration symposium, weavers share stories and insight
By Lisa Phu
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Whenever Juneau weaver Shgen George travels, her loom goes with her. She transports the large portable loom in a ski bag, advice she got from Clarissa Rizal. “This loom and this ski bag have literally traveled around the world with me and I weave every day, pretty much no matter what, even if it’s two minutes,” George said…(more) (6-10-16)

Celebration: No border between us
Celebration a time for groups in U.S. and Canada to strengthen their bonds
By RANDI SPRAY
Capital City Weekly
When the U.S.-Canada border was drawn through Southeast Alaska in 1903, it left Tlingit, Haida and Tshimshian peoples on both sides. But though that line may have led to different political and legal systems, they are one people and Celebration strengthens them all, they say. “We’re all on this road toward reclaiming our culture, our language and really our identity as First Nation or as Native people,” said Sean Smith, a member of the Kwanlin Daghalhaan K’e dancers out of Whitehorse and Kwanlin Dün First Nation Councillor. Smith is Tutchone Tlingit…( more) (6-10-16)

Celebration's lead dance group has some surprises up its sleeve
Catch the Git-Hoan dancers Thursday, Friday night
By Mary Catherine Martin
Capital City Weekly
The Git-Hoan Dancers, the Tsimshian dance group started 20 years ago by master carver and culture bearer David A. Boxley, have some surprises for those attending Celebration — but you’ll have go to their Centennial Hall performance to see for yourself. Here are some hints. One surprise, said artist and dance group member David R. Boxley, David A. Boxley’s son, is “a very modern song. The other — all I will say is that no one will have seen anything like it”…( more) (6-10-16)

David R. Boxley wins 'Best of Show' in Celebration art competition
Sealaska Heritage Institute's Northwest Coast Juried Art Show "Art and At.óow" opened Wednesday
By Lisa Phu
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Loud cheers and applause erupted from the audience in the Walter Soboleff Building’s clan house as David R. Boxley was awarded Best of Show, the top prize in Sealaska Heritage Institute’s Northwest Coast Juried Art Show, Wednesday afternoon. “I’m totally blown away by this,” Boxley said. “I have worked for a very long time to understand formline. I believe that it is the most beautiful thing in the world. I’ve still got paint on my arm from new formline that I was making just last night to get ready to dance today”…(more) (6-10-16)

Building bridges for Native LGBTQ: 'You're not alone'
By Paula Ann Solis
JUNEAU EMPIRE
In any community, finding someone you trust and can say “I’m gay” to can be difficult. In a remote village seemingly disconnected from the world, it can feel down right impossible. “When you live in a village you can feel like you’re the only gay person,” Tlingit artist Ricky Tagaban said…(more) (6-10-16)

Slideshow: Celebration, day 1
JUNEAU EMPIRE
(6-9-16)

10-year-old completes 3-day canoe journey to Celebration
By Emily Kwong
KCAW
At Celebration, waiting has a sound — of drums, of voices raised in songs of welcome. The crowd is scanning the horizon. And one grandmother, Marie Johnson, is looking extra closely for the tip of a red canoe carrying her grandson. His name is Roary Earl Bennett. He’s 10 years old from Kake, and he’s making the journey with his grandfather...(more) (6-9-16)

Slideshow: Celebration processional and grand entrance
By Rashah McChesney
KTOO
Hundreds of Alaska Natives and a handful of other cultural groups gathered for a processional and grand entrance during the first day of Celebration on Wednesday. The biennial festival of Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian tribal members kicked off on Wednesday with a Ravenstail and Chilkat weavers presentation in Juneau and will end Saturday with a grand exit...( more) (6-9-16)

High fashion, 'Indigenized' at Celebration
By Annie Bartholomew
KTOO
At a kitchen table in a Douglas home, Lily Hope arranges buttons into a basketry pattern on a silky blue dress. Her auntie Deanna Lampe cuts fibers of cedar and wool spun together. They’re two of the 17 Alaska Native artists whose pieces willl be showcased at a Sealaska Heritage Institute‘s Native Fashion Show Friday, a first for Celebration.
Designer Lily Hope creates a wave basketry design in buttons on a silky blue dress for Celebration's Native Fashion Show. “We’ve always been sewers,” said Lampe. “Beadmakers and earring makers,” said Hope. “I think I’ve been sewing buttons since I was 9. That’s the hazard of having a family that makes art"...(more) (6-9-16)

Slideshow: Canoe landings kick off Celebration 2016
By Rashah McChesney
Members of the One People Canoe Society finished the last leg of their weeklong journey from Angoon to Juneau on Wednesday. Their arrival marked the unofficial beginning of Celebration, a biennial festival of Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian tribal members organized by the Sealaska Heritage Institute...( more) (6-9-16)

SHI to host internationally-known Irish dance group at Celebration
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) will host an internationally-known Irish dance group at Celebration as part of its ongoing effort to promote cross-cultural understanding. The O’Shea-Ryan Irish Dancers group from Australia has been in existence for more than 60 years and performed in international festivals across the world, most recently in Iceland, Budapest and Montenegro...(more) (6-9-16)

Fashion! Art! New Events Galore at Sealaska Heritage Institute’s Celebration 2016
Indian Country Today
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) will introduce several new events at Celebration 2016 and migrate some features of its biennial, dance-and-culture festival to the new Walter Soboleff Building in Juneau.  New events include a Native Fashion Show, Juried Youth Art Exhibit, a Ravenstail and Chilkat weaving presentation and class, a comic routine and a jazz piano concert...(more) (6-8-16)

Haute couture with a Native voice
By Paula Ann Solis
Capital City Weekly
One beadwork design on an indigenous garment might take an artist 30 hours to complete. Really, the design is rooted much deeper, in lifetimes of storytelling and traditions passed from one generation to another. Tlingit artists Lily Hope and Deanna Lampe, Hope’s aunt, know this to be true. The two women have been working hours on end to prepare for an upcoming Native Fashion Show, the first of its kind during the biennial Celebration in Juneau. The women said the event will put Native designs not just on a runway, but into mainstream couture…(more) (6-8-16)

Celebration 2016 aims to renew youth engagement in culture
By Quinton Chandler
KTOO
This year, in addition to Celebration’s core goal to engage Native youth, organizers in Juneau are promoting the convergence of multiple generations and cultures. Every other year several thousand people travel to the state capital for Celebration, a four day event meant to renew appreciation for the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian cultures of Southeast Alaska. The event is rooted in a desire to pass Southeast Alaska Native culture on to future generations.( more) (6-8-16)

Canoes to arrive today for Celebration kick-off
By Sam DeGrave
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Celebration, a biennial festival of Alaska Native culture, officially starts today. But for a handful of paddlers from multiple Southeast communities it started about a week ago. Late last week, several canoes — each carrying about 10 people — departed from Angoon headed for Juneau, a trip of roughly 100 miles. Canoes from Kake, Ketchikan, Sitka, Angoon, Hoonah and Yakutat made the trip as a part of a recent (but unofficially sanctioned) Celebration tradition started by the One People Canoe Society in 2008…( more) (6-8-16)

What not to miss at Celebration 2016
By Lisa Phu
JUNEAU EMPIRE
With 50 dance groups, 30 events and about a dozen different venues, Celebration 2016 may seem a little daunting. For first time attendees, here’s a sampling of what not to miss over the four days of festivities celebrating Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian culture…(more) (6-8-16)

Celebration: In Memoriam
By Lisa Phu
JUNEAU EMPIRE
In honor of Celebration, here is a look at a few people who left a big impact on the Alaska Native community before “walking into the forest” this past year…(more) (6-8-16)

Youth and Northwest Art Showcased at Sealaska Celebration Awards
Indian Country Today
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) will open its eighth, biennial Juried Art Show this week and give awards in five divisions. For the first time, the show will include a display of exemplary works by some of the most acclaimed Northwest Coast artists alive today. The institute also will give awards to participants of its new Juried Art Youth Exhibit during the ceremony, held during Celebration 2016...( more) (6-7-16)

Sealaska Celebration 2016: Haa Shuká—Weaving Traditional Knowledge Into Our Future
Indian Country Today
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) kicks off its biennial Celebration this week, marking the 34th year since the inception of the popular dance and culture festival. Celebration is a major, four-day event organized by Sealaska Heritage every two years. First held in 1982, it has become the one of the largest events in the state, drawing thousands of people and millions of dollars to the capital...( more) (6-6-16)

Tlingit artist protests auction of Native artifacts in Paris
By Quinton Chandler
KTOO
The Paris auction, orchestrated by the company Eve, wasn’t just about selling old relics. Members of the tribes whose ancestors made these artifacts say they are living beings and the spirits of their ancestors are inside of them…( more) (6-6-16)

Legislature may move to Anchorage after collision with Celebration
By James Brooks
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Every two years, Celebration brings thousands of visitors to Juneau for a week of Alaska Native festivities. This year, Celebration events are on a collision course with the unusual extension of the Alaska Legislature’s work in Juneau…(more) (6-3-16)

SHI to unveil Juried Art competition winners, “Exemplary Works” gallery
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute will open its eighth, biennial Juried Art Show next week and give awards in five divisions. For the first time, the show will include a display of exemplary works by some of the most acclaimed Northwest Coast artists alive today. The institute also will give awards to participants of its new Juried Art Youth Exhibit during the ceremony, held during Celebration 2016. The Juried Art Show will include 36 pieces by 22 artists. Winners will receive prizes in the following categories…(more) (Juneau Empire) (6-1-16)

SHI youth art exhibit to open
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute eighth, biennial Juried Art Show opening next week will feature a new Juried Art Youth Exhibit. The Juried Youth Art Exhibit will showcase 35 pieces and include 34 objects made by 28 individual young artists and one artwork that was made by 61 6th grade students from Dzantik’i Heeni Middle School...(more) (Juneau Empire) (6-1-16)

SHI releases three children's books
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute has released the first three of eighteen culturally-based children’s books that reflect the Native worldview. The books are part of the institute’s Baby Raven Reads, a program for Alaska Native families with children up to age five that promotes language development and school readiness. The series includes a counting book—“10 Sitka Herring”—which traces the fate of a herring school from 10 to one fish as they encounter Southeast Alaska predators. Herring and herring eggs are a subsistence resource and a staple of Native diets...(more) ( Juneau Empire) (5-26-16)

How laws meant to protect African elephants may end up hurting Alaska Native artists
By Mike Dunham
Alaska Dispatch News
Suppose you own a sculpture by Siberian Yupik artist Beulah Oittillian made from walrus ivory, whalebone and polar bear fur. And suppose you bring it to Los Angeles, where someone offers to buy it from you. Can you sell it to them? Once upon a time, the answer from those familiar with art and law would have been an unequivocal yes. The Marine Mammal Protection Act  says federal prohibitions against taking marine mammals and selling things made from them do not apply to "any Indian, Aleut, or Eskimo who resides in Alaska … if such taking is done for the purposes of creating and selling authentic native articles of handicrafts and clothing." That would seem to cover the resale of Oittillian's sculpture. Right?
Don't be so sure...(more) (5-23-16)

A dream come true
By Randi Spray
Capital City Weekly
KLUKWAN — The community heritage center has been a long time coming for Klukwan and they weren’t going to let 86-degree heat stop them from celebrating. The Jilkaat Kwaan Cultural Heritage and Bald Eagle Preserve Visitor Center opened on May 14, nearly a century after the idea of putting a cultural museum in the small Tlingit village 22 miles north of Haines was first discussed. It was a painful, difficult journey at times, one including stolen treasures, a ten-year legal battle that divided the community, and a gargantuan fundraising effort that’s not yet over…(more) (Juneau Empire) (5-18-16)

$100,000 grant to bring Native art classes to Juneau prisoners
National Endowment for the Arts award allows Sealaska Heritage Institute to train inmates in Native art
By Lisa Phu
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute has sponsored art classes in the Juneau prison as funding allows, including two multi-day art workshops with formline design artist David A. Boxley and carver Wayne Price at Lemon Creek Correctional Center last year. Now, a $100,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts Our Town program will allow the regional Native nonprofit to continue hiring master artists to teach Native art classes in prison...( more) (Capital City Weekly) (5-11-16)

25 Best Things to do in Juneau, Alaska
VacationIdea Dream Vacation Magazine
The site of Alaska’s first major gold strike, Juneau was founded in 1880 by Richard Harris and Joe Juneau. It was initially a tent camp of about 40 miners that quickly transformed into a small town and is now the State Capital…(more) (5-3-16)

Math, theater camp deadlines approach
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute’s summer programs are open for registration. The first is Latseen Running Camp, from June 14-17, for Alaska Native students entering 5th - 8th grade. Registration ends May 13. The second is Voices on the Land Summer Theater Intensive, which integrates traditional stories, song and dance, and Tlingit language...( more) (4-27-16)

Traditional foods cooking contest during Celebration
Capital City Weekly
Register to compete in Sealaska Heritage Institute’s 2016 soapberry contest, held during Celebration. The grand prize is $500, second prize is $250, and third prize is $100. The deadline for entries is June 8 at 5 p.m.; judging is from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m...(more) (Juneau Empire) (4-20-16)

Sealaska Heritage offers sales outlet for Native artists
By Mike Dunham
Alaska Dispatch News
The Sealaska Heritage Store in Juneau has received the art collection of the Alaska Native Arts Foundation, which closed its Anchorage store in February. In addition to the art items, estimated to have a value of $150,000, the Sealaska Heritage Institute also received intellectual property, including ANAF’s list of Alaska Native artists. The foundation has represented more than 1,300 artists over the past 15 years. Those artists will now be able to sell their work through the Sealas-ka gallery, said store manager Lee Kadinger…(more) (4-19-16)

Grappling with the Complexity of NAGPRA
By Frances Madeson
Indian Country Today
The room was both packed and hushed at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe when Brian Vallo, director of SAR’s Indian Arts Research Center, introduced the guest panelists in the second of a series of four evenings that will comprise “Forging New Landscapes in Cultural Stewardship & Repatriation.” For an intense hour, in an almost reverent atmosphere, attendees were privy to the expert reflections, insights and epiphanies of moderator T.J. Ferguson, an anthropologist from the University of Arizona, and the three Native panelists: former Tesuque Pueblo Governor Mark Mitchell; independent consultant Theresa Pasqual from Acoma Pueblo; and Dr. Rosita Worl from Alaska, who served on the NAGPRA Review Board for 12 years...(more) (4-12-16)

How to protect indigenous intellectual property: lecture two

Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage is accepting applications to Opening the Box: Southeast Middle School Math and Culture Academy. Explore mathematical connections found in cultural heritage and knowledge through hands on learning…(more) (3-23-16)

Lecture on injustices and inequities in Native education
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute and the University of Alaska Southeast’s Preparing Indigenous Teachers and Administrators for Alaska Schools program will sponsor a free lecture by Dr. Marie Battiste from the University of Saskatchewan on the injustices and inequities in education for indigenous people. Battiste will share key features of educational change that must be addressed in order for the decolonization of education to take place...(more) (3-20-16)

SHI accepting applications for new juried art youth exhibit
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor a new youth exhibit of Northwest Coast art during the biennial celebration in an effort to increase the number of youth making high quality pieces and to share their work with the public. Cash awards will be made to schools of the winners for art supplies to be used by schools or organizations for future instruction in Northwest Coast art…(more) (Juneau Empire) (3-9-16)

Sealaska Heritage’s upcoming youth programs
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute’s released their upcoming summer youth programs so the community could save the date. June 14-17 there will be the Latseen Running Camp for students entering grades fifth-eight. This will take place in Juneau. For more information, contact jasmine.james@sealaska.com and 586-9264. There will be two sessions of Voices on the Land Summer Intensive. The first will be June 20-25 for students entering grades fourth and fifth. Both will take place in Juneau. For more information, contact Jackie.kookesh@sealaska.com and 586-9229…(more) (Juneau Empire) (3-9-16)

Alaska gift shops busted for allegedly selling fake indigenous art
CBC
When tourists step off cruise ships in Alaska, they're often surrounded by gift shops selling local indigenous art. But American authorities are now warning customers to be on the lookout for fakes. Charges were laid recently against owners at four different gift shops for falsely claiming some of the art they sold was made by Alaskan indigenous artists. Rosita Worl is the president of Sealaska Heritage Institute and an advocate for indigenous Alaskan artists. She told As It Happens host Helen Mann, it was about time that charges were laid…(more) (3-8-16)

Shop owners charged with selling fake Alaska Native artwork
By Dan Joling
Associated Press
Four shops catering to Alaska cruise ship visitors sold whale and walrus bone carvings for $1,000 or more each that they falsely claimed were made by Alaska Native artists, according to federal prosecutors. The shop owners in Juneau, Ketchikan and Skagway have been charged with violating the federal Indian Arts and Crafts Act, prosecutors announced late Thursday. A Skagway employee also was charged...(more) (3-4-16)

What A Native American Fish Hook’s Journey Says About A Little-Known Repatriation Law
By Andrea Shea
WBUR--NPR, Boston
Throughout history Native Americans have had their land, possessions and culture taken away. But in recent decades the U.S. government has worked to right some wrongs through repatriation. Museums and federally funded institutions are required to go through their collections and report artifacts that might belong to tribes. Now a small theological school in Newton is navigating this complex legal process for the first time. Its collection of about 125 Native American artifacts includes one known as the Halibut Hook, and a lot of people are interested in its fate...(more) (3-4-16)

Scholar: Trademarks could protect Alaska Native art and culture
By Clara Miller
Capital City Weekly
Appropriation of indigenous peoples’ art and culture: it’s something that’s been happening for decades, if not centuries, and that still happens even today. Those imitations can threaten not only the integrity of the culture whose art is appropriated, but at times, even that culture’s survival. At a late February talk at Sealaska Heritage Institute, Jacob Adams, a visiting scholar from Norway, had a possible solution: trademarks, which he said are one of the best mechanisms for protecting indigenous cultural heritage...(more) (Juneau Empire) (3-2-16)

Traditional canoe in progress at Sitka park
by Brielle Schaeffer
KCAW
For the next few months carvers will be working at Sitka National Historical Park — but not on one of the park’s famous totem poles. As part of the National park Service’s centennial, the Sealaska Heritage Institute has commissioned a traditional canoe. The sponsors hope the project allows visitors to look into the past, while the carvers perpetuate this craft into the future...(more) (3-2-16)

Reviving an endangered art
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
In a carving shed in Sitka National Historical Park, a team of five well-known carvers are continuing, and reviving, an art practiced since time immemorial — carving a wooden dugout canoe from the intact trunk of one of the Tongass National Forest’s enormous trees. Pacific Northwest Native peoples once paddled carved spruce and red cedar dugout canoes up and down the coast, but very few people know, now, how to make them. Haida carver TJ Young, Tlingit carver Tommy Joseph, and Tlingit/Unangan carvers Nicholas Galanin and Jerrod Galanin are all carving under the direction of Steve Brown, who’s taught the art up and down the Northwest Coast. (Brown has been adopted by the Stikine Kiksadi.)…(more) (Juneau Empire) (2-14-16)

SHI to sponsor lecture on Indigenous Intellectual Property Rights
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute is sponsoring a lecture by visiting scholar, Jacob Adams, from Norway who is researching indigenous intellectual property rights. In his talk, “Indigenous Issues in Native Handicrafts and Intellectual Property,” Adams—a Ph.D. student in law who serves on the law faculty at the University of Tromsø in Norway—will introduce his work in the area of indigenous intellectual property rights. Through his research, Adams, who is also a practicing attorney with law degrees from universities in Australia and the United States, is examining alternative means to protect indigenous intellectual property using trademark law, with a focus on Northwest Coast culture and art...(more) (Juneau Empire) (2-24-16)

Fighting language loss: 'Our language is a source of wealth'
By LISA PHU    
JUNEAU EMPIRE
“Even though we are from different tribes, we are all in the same canoe. We need to work together to preserve the languages of our ancestors,” said Tsimshian artist from Metlakatla David R. Boxley at the opening of the first Alaska Language Summit on Tuesday.
Boxley spoke to a crowd of about 50 people in the clan house of Sealaska Heritage Institute’s Walter Soboleff Building. Summit participants came from all over Alaska, including Barrow, Dillingham, Anchorage, Fairbanks and Kotzebue. Presenters traveled from Hawaii and Canada; one teleconferenced in from New Zealand...(more) (2-24-16)

Empire welcomes new staffer, bids farewell to another
JUNEAU EMPIRE
The Juneau Empire welcomed a familiar face to its newsroom last week, while saying goodbye to another. Lisa Phu joined the Empire on Friday as a general assignment reporter, which also was the last day for longtime arts editor and Capital City Weekly editor Amy Fletcher…(who) accepted a position with Sealaska Heritage Institute as a publications specialist…(more) (2-23-16)

Speaker: Childhood trauma can lead to health problems
Sealaska speaker talks about long-lasting role of childhood trauma
By Clara Miller
JUNEAU EMPIRE
What if health issues, addictions and premature death are caused by the role of repressing childhood trauma? Vincent J. Felitti, M.D., made this case to a packed room at the Walter Soboleff Building Tuesday, backing up his assertions with decades of study, research and analysis. His conclusion was that repressed adverse childhood experiences can manifest in adults by altering their well-being, causing disease and even premature death. “Addiction is the unconscious, compulsive use of psychoactive materials or agents”…(more) (2-14-16)

SHI accepting applications for new juried art youth exhibit
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor a new youth exhibit of Northwest Coast art during the biennial celebration in an effort to increase the number of youth making high quality pieces and to share their work with the public. Cash awards will be made to schools of the winners for art supplies to be used by schools or organizations for future instruction in Northwest Coast art…(more) (2-24-16)

SHI accepting applications for new juried art youth exhibit
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor a new youth exhibit of Northwest Coast art during the biennial Celebration in an effort to increase the number of youth making high quality pieces and to share their work with the public. Cash awards will be made to schools of the winners for art supplies to be used by schools or organizations for future instruction in Northwest Coast art. SHI will award $350…(more) (Juneau Empire) (2-10-16)

SHI, PITAAS to sponsor free performance by Byron Nicholai
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute and the University of Alaska Southeast PITAAS program are sponsoring a performance by Byron Nicholai, who has gained national attention through his Facebook page “I Sing. You Dance.” Nicholai, a high school senior from Toksook Bay, blends traditional and modern styles in his music to preserve Yup’ik culture and bring it into the mainstream consciousness. The free event is scheduled at 5 pm, Saturday, Feb. 13, in Shuká Hít (the clan house) at the Walter Soboleff Building in Juneau…(more) (2-10-16)

Red-cedar log to be transformed into traditional dugout canoe
Project aims to perpetuate endangered Northwest Coast art
Paula Dobbyn/KTUU
Three Alaska Native artists will create a full-size dugout canoe through a partnership involving Sealaska Heritage Institute and Sitka National Historic Park. Master carver Steve Brown will lead the project, according to a news release from Sealaska Heritage. Brown's apprentices will be T.J. Young, Tommy Joseph and Jerrod and Nicholas Galanin, who also are accomplished artists. "I'm pretty excited about it. I've never carved a canoe before," Young told KTUU…(more) (2-8-16)

Renowned physician to speak on effects of childhood trauma
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor a free lecture by one of the world’s foremost experts on childhood trauma and its adverse impacts on victims decades later. In his lecture, The Lifelong Effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences, Dr. Vincent J. Felitti will discuss research which found that humans convert childhood traumatic emotional experiences into organic disease later in life…( more) (2-4-16)

First Friday Art Walk
Capital City Weekly
Here’s a look at what’s scheduled for the First Friday Art Walk this month in Juneau...(more) (2-3-16)

Photo: Voices on the land
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Artist-in-residence Edward Littlefield directs Floyd Dryden Middle School music students during an assembly on Friday. ‘Telling Our Stories: Voices on the Land’ is a residency sponsored by Sealaska Heritage Institute that allowed Littlefield to explore culture and music with over 180 students during the three week program…(more) (1-31-16)

Photo: Log now, canoe later
By James Poulson
Daily Sitka Sentinel
Sitka National Historical Park maintenance worker Jared Hazel nails down wooden blocks to keep a red cedar log from rolling on Jan. 20 behind the Visitor Center. The log will remain at its present site as it is turned into a 28-foot-long Tlingit canoe over the next few months by carver Steve Brown...(more) (1-25-16)

Looking forward
Capital City Weekly
2016 is shaping up to be an exciting year in the arts. Here’s a look at a few of the big events planned in Southeast, in chronological order....(more) (1-7-16)

SHI, State Library, to sponsor lecture on influential archaeologist
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute and the Alaska State Library Historical Collections will sponsor a lecture next week on a well-known anthropologist who did field work in Southeast Alaska. Professor Marie-Francoise Guedon of the University of Ottawa will speak on working with the late anthropologist Frederica de Laguna in Alaska and share early findings from her ongoing research into matrilineal societies around the world...(more) (1-2-15)

Bright moments of 2015
Capital City Weekly
This annual feature, which formerly appeared in the Empire’s Arts section, is designed to celebrate creativity in all its forms. Each of the following lists of five memorable moments from 2015 presents just a tiny slice of the whole picture, as viewed through the words of one community member. Taken as a whole, the lists are reflective of a spirit of gratitude toward all those who devote their time, energy and talent through the arts, enriching our lives in the process...(more) (Juneau Empire) (12-30-15)

Andover Newton repatriating Native objects after citation
By Jonathan Dame
Newton Tab
Federal officials have found a Newton seminary out of compliance with a 1990 law governing the repatriation of Native American artifacts — a charge the school does not dispute as it takes steps to rectify the situation. Andover Newton Theological School is now in the process of returning certain artifacts from its collection to tribes or individual Native Americans that may find them sacred…(more) (12-17-15)

The future of Northwest Coast art
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
At a panel on the future of Northwest Coast indigenous art, young Alaska Native artists talked about issues facing the art and the artists who make it, as well as how they'd like to see that art develop. Panelists were Rico Worl of Juneau, Nick Galanin of Sitka, Alison Bremner of Yakutat and David R. Boxley of Metlakatla. Xhunei Lance Twitchell, an artist and assistant professor of Alaska Native Languages at the University of Alaska Southeast, moderated…(more) (Juneau Empire) (12-9-15)

SHI welcomes found Chilkat robe to Juneau
By James Brooks
JUNEAU EMPIRE
More than 50 Southeast residents gathered at the clan house in the Walter Soboleff Building in Juneau Dec. 1 to celebrate the return of a Chilkat blanket sent by a collector in Texas. Rosita Worl, president of Sealaska Heritage Institute, said the return was a moment of sorrow and joy - sorrow because it had been absent for so long and joy because it had returned…(more) (12-9-15)

Art for all children
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
For a few days at the end of September, all the second graders in the Juneau School District sat in Shuká Hit, the clan house in Sealaska Heritage Institute's Walter Soboleff Building, listening to storyteller Lily Hudson Hope and learning about Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian customs. Next year's second graders will do the same, as will the next, as part of an ongoing initiative from many collaborators to give all of Juneau's kids arts excursions every year. These second graders were full of questions. One wanted to know about the custom of fire dishes...(more) (Juneau Empire) (12-3-15)

Ceremony celebrates Chilkat blanket's return
JUNEAU EMPIRE
They were there to see an ancestor.
On Tuesday afternoon, more than 50 Southeast residents gathered at the clan house in the Walter Soboleff Building to celebrate the Southeast Alaska return of a Chilkat blanket sent by a collector in Texas. Rosita Worl, president of Sealaska Heritage Institute, said the return was a moment of sorrow and joy…(more) (12-2-15)

Chilkat robe completes journey back to Southeast
By Elizabeth Jenkins
A Chilkat robe that was for sale on eBay has returned to Southeast Alaska. The robe traveled all the way from Texas, where it was almost sold to the highest bidder. Instead, Sealaska Heritage Institute welcomed it home. A crowd packed the red cedar clan house at Walter Soboleff Building downtown: Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian gathered together. The ceremony began with two songs of mourning: one eagle, the other raven. The robe was brought in a cardboard FedEx box and unfurled to reveal a black and yellow design…(more) (12-1-15)

SHI welcomes found Chilkat robe to Juneau
By James Brooks
JUNEAU EMPIRE
George Blucker found it in an Illinois flea market. Now, it’s coming back to Alaska. This afternoon, Sealaska Heritage Institute will formally take possession of a sacred Chilkat robe in a ceremony at the Walter Soboleff Building. The public is invited to the event, which begins at 1:30 p.m. “We’re pretty excited,” said Rosita Worl, president of SHI...(more) (12-1-15)

SHI accepting applications for revamped Art Show and Competition
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute is accepting applications from artists who want to compete in its eighth biennial Juried Art Show and Competition, which will expand to include new divisions and a youth show. SHI will award prizes in five divisions…(more) (Juneau Empire) (11-25-15)

'Discovering Haida Art' with Robert Davidson
By Amy Fletcher
Capital City Weekly
When renowned Haida artist Robert Davidson was a kid, he used to root for the cowboys while watching old Westerns, cheering with his friends when the "bad guys" - the Indians - were killed. Then his uncle took him aside and explained that he and his family were "Indians" themselves. "When he told me, I cried," Davidson recalled last week during a Native American Heritage Month talk hosted by Sealaska Heritage Institute in Juneau...(more) (Juneau Empire) (11-25-15)

Despite mysteries of author's life, 'Picture Man' illuminates Yakutat
David A. James
Alaska Dispatch News
Newcomers to America have always faced challenges adjusting to a new country and its ways, but at certain times some have been singled out and demonized upon arrival simply for their ethnicity or country of origin.  Germans, Italians, Jews, Chinese, and more recently Latin Americans and Middle Easterners have landed on these shores seeking a better future only to be subjected to treatment sometimes far worse than what they endured in their homelands…(more) (11-21-15)

Chilkat robe returning to Southeast
By Elizabeth Jenkins
KTOO
Sealaska Heritage Institute has acquired a Chilkat robe that was to be auctioned off on eBay on Wednesday. After the seller learned the robe was a sacred item, he allowed SHI to purchase it at the reserve price of $14,500. There were already multiple bids. Typically, these objects can fetch upwards of $30,000…(more) (11-20-15)

Photo: Cultural education
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Tlingit weaver and teacher Lily Hope guides Auke Bay Elementary School second graders through the cultural exhibit in the Walter Soboleff Center on Thursday. The event is part of the Ensuring the Arts for Any Given Child program, which was founded by the Kennedy Center to create full access to arts education programs and resources for K-8 students. The Kennedy Center works with 18 sites in the country and Juneau is one of them. Starting in November, all second-grade students in the Juneau School District will go on annual arts excursions to the Walter Soboleff Building to learn about the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian cultures...(more) (11-20-15)

Southeast Alaska cultural group buys Chilkat robe that showed up on eBay
By Mike Dunham
Alaska Dispatch News
A retired artist in Texas has sold a very old Chilkat robe to Alaska’s Sealaska Heritage Institute at a significant discount and a significant sacrifice to himself. George Blucker, who has owned the robe since the 1980s, told Alaska Dispatch News he was motivated to let the Southeast Alaska cultural group buy the piece at a reduced price “out of respect for Native American traditions and religion”…(more) (11-19-15)

SHI acquired sacred Chilkat robe on eBay
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute said Wednesday that it has acquired a sacred Chilkat robe from an eBay seller who willingly took a loss on the transaction so the piece could be repatriated to the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian peoples…(more) (11-19-15)

SHI to sponsor workshop on art and math
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute is sponsoring a free workshop for educators on the connection between math and formline design. The class will be taught by master Tsimshian artist David R. Boxley, who worked on the house front in the Walter Soboleff Building. The house front is one of three monumental pieces installed at the facility. Boxley was also the juror for SHI's 2014 Juried Art Show and Competition…(more) (Juneau Empire) (11-18-15)

Walter Soboleff retrospective
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
At a retrospective in honor of the second annual Walter Soboleff Day, observed Nov. 14, speakers including family, friends and a pastor told stories that showcased the late Tlingit leader's sense of humor, generosity, faith, and his extraordinary grace, especially under circumstances that would embitter many people…(more) (Juneau Empire) (11-18-15)

SHI joins forces with Any Given Child, local groups, in arts initiative
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute has partnered with a national arts program and local organizations to teach Southeast Native cultures to children annually at the Walter Soboleff Building. Starting in November, all second-grade students in the Juneau School District will go on annual arts excursions to the Walter Soboleff Building to learn about the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian cultures…(more) (Juneau Empire) (11-18-15)

Photo: Haida master artist Robert Davidson
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Haida Master Artist Robert Davidson gives a talk about his personal journey of discovery through Haida art and ceremony on Tuesday at the Soboleff Center as part of a lecture series to celebrate Native American Heritage Month. The series is sponsored by the Sealaska Heritage Institute…(more) (11-18-15)

Community remembers Native leader for 2nd annual Dr. Walter Soboleff Day
By Lisa Phu
KTOO
Family members and community leaders shared anecdotes of the late Walter Soboleff on Friday. Sealaska Heritage Institute and Sealaska Corp. hosted the event inside the clan house of the building named in his honor. The Tlingit cultural and spiritual leader died in 2011 at the age of 102. Three years later, the Alaska Legislature passed a bill naming his birthday Nov. 14 as Dr. Walter Soboleff Day...(more) (11-14-15)

Photos: Walter Soboleff Day
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Mary Richey Sell and Nadine Hafner, right, of the Sealaska Heritage Institute, carry a painting of Dr. Walter Soboleff to show elders after the painting was transferred from Sealaska Corporation to SHI during a ceremonry in honor of Dr. Soboleff in the Walter Soboleff Center on Friday...(more) (11-15-15)

Local events planned for Walter Soboleff Day, observed Nov. 14
Capital City Weekly
WalterSoboleff Day is Nov. 14, an observance that was made official last year following passage of HB217. The following events have been scheduled in the late Tlingit spiritual leader's honor. 'A Restrospective View': Sealaska and Sealaska Heritage Institute will host a discussion about Soboleff on Friday, Nov. 13, at the Walter Soboleff Building on the eve of Walter Soboleff Day...(more) (Juneau Empire) (11-11-15)

David Boxley talks Native, Tsimshian art revival
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
At his very first Native art show, David A. Boxley, now a renowned Tsimshian carver and culture bearer, carved Tlingit and Haida totem poles from books. He used model paint instead of acrylics, and suffered from the fumes. In 2012, he and his son, David R. Boxley, carved a totem pole at the Museum of the American Indian. Through a live video feed on the internet, they waved at schoolkids in Metlakatla on request. More recently they created the Tsimshian house front that greets visitors to Sealaska Heritage Institute’s Walter Soboleff Building...(more) (Juneau Empire) (11-11-15)

SHI to sponsor lectures for Native American Heritage Month, Soboleff Day
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor its annual noon lecture series to celebrate Native American Heritage Month and Walter Soboleff Day in November. This year’s lineup includes distinguished Northwest Coast and Alutiiq artists and will conclude in early December with a panel discussion by young Native artists on the future of Northwest Coast art. SHI also will host a panel discussion titled Retrospective View of Dr. Walter Soboleff to commemorate the state’s annual Walter Soboleff Day…( more) (Juneau Empire) (11-4-15)

MRV Architects wins Merit Award for Walter Soboleff Building
JUNEAU EMPIRE
MRV Architects won the Merit Award for their design of the Walter Soboleff Building as part of Alaska Architectural Firms’ 2015 Design Awards. AIA Alaska Design Awards are judged by architects from another state or region that has similar geography and climate. Projects are considered by how they exemplify Alaska’s northern design requirements, sustainability, site and context sensitivity, and innovative design...(more) (11-2-15)

These 8 pieces of architectural brilliance in Alaska could WOW anyone
By Casea Peterson
ONLYINYOURSTATE
Architecture, old or new, is art in its boldest terms. A huge skyscraper that looms over bustling streets or a glass-walled living room perched far out over troubled waters each represent the bravery and elegance of architecture…(more) (10-31-15)

Tlingit leaders take the stage at clan conference opening
By Lisa Phu
KTOO
Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott’s comments focused on nurturing and inspiring the next generation of Alaska Natives. He said today’s youth witness violence and dysfunction. “We will ourselves work hard to create wellness and health in our own communities. We must take care of our children and we must make that a moral and cultural imperative,” Mallott said...( more) (10-29-15)

SHI to co-sponsor art, Tsimshian classes
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) is bringing two master artists to Juneau to teach Northwest Coast art to inmates at Juneau's prison and half-way house. One of them will also teach a free language class. Washington-based Tsimshian master artist David A. Boxley will teach formline design at Gastineau Human Services and Sm'algyax (Tsimshian) mini-immersion classes at the Walter Soboleff Building. Haines-based Tlingit master artist Wayne Price will teach carving to inmates at Lemon Creek Correctional Facility…(more) (Juneau Empire) (10-28-15)

SHI hosts talks in honor of Native American Heritage Month
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute is hosting a lecture series in honor of Native American Heritage Month. David A. Boxley will begin Tuesday, Nov. 3, with a lecture called "The Revival of Tsimshian Art." Next will be Steve Brown, Tues., Nov. 10, with "The Antiquity and Evolution of Northwest Coast Art." A panel will speak Friday, Nov. 13 on retrospective views of Dr. Walter Soboleff; Robert Davidson will speak Tues., Nov. 17 on "Discovering Haida Art: A Personal Journey”…(more) (Juneau Empire) (10-18-15)

Victory for Sealaska Heritage underscores weakness in the law
By Elizabeth Jenkins
KTOO
Federal investigators have found that the country’s oldest theological college broke the law regarding its Native art. Andover Newton Theological School planned to sell off 80 pieces in its collection, including a sacred Tlingit halibut hook. Now some tribal leaders are wondering if repatriation laws should be tougher…(more) (10-23-15)

Feds back Native group in artifacts probe
By Rachel D’Oro
JUNEAU EMPIRE
A Massachusetts college was found in violation of a federal law regulating the possession and sale of potentially sacred artifacts following a complaint from an organization of Alaska Natives. The U.S. Interior Department said an investigation substantiated the complaint against Andover Newton Theological School filed in June by the Sealaska Heritage Institute. The institute’s president, Rosita Worl, said the school possesses at least two Southeast Alaska artifacts, including a Tlingit halibut hook that is considered sacred…(more) (ABC News) (Minneapolis Star Tribune) (10-21-15)

Feds say theological school required by law to repatriate Tlingit artifacts
By Mike Dunham
Alaska Dispatch News
The U.S. Department of the Interior has issued a letter stating that Alaska Native items in the possession of Andover Newton Theological School of Massachusetts are subject to the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. The Sealaska Heritage Institute of Juneau alleged in June that a halibut hook in the school’s collection on loan to the Peabody Essex Museum of Massachusetts was a sacred object used in fishing rituals…( more) (10-20-15)

Federal investigators side with Sealaska in dispute over cultural objects
KTUU-TV
Federal investigators have found that an East Coast school that planned to sell Native objects in its possession is subject to the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) and is violating the law, according to the Juneau-based Sealaska Heritage Institute. The U.S. Department of the Interior has given the Andover Newton Theological School of Massachusetts 45 days to respond to its decision, which was issued in late September, according to the institute…(more) (10-20-15)

Art Beat: Alaska Native elders, Juneau churchman seek return of Tlingit objects
By Mike Dunham
Alaska Dispatch News
For the past several months, a back-and-forth debate over Alaska Native items held in Massachusetts has embroiled one of America’s oldest museums, the oldest graduate theological seminary and the Sealaska Heritage Institute of Juneau. Bits and pieces of the story have popped up as the matter has evolved, with many assertions presented, some denials and numerous personalities involved -- notably the late, revered Tlingit elder Walter Soboleff. Soboleff died in 2011 when he was more than 100 years old. Sealaska’s new cultural research facility in Juneau is named for him...(more) (10-15-15)

SHI's work featured in 50 humanities projects that have shaped the country
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute's work on the Tlingit language was chosen by a federal humanities agency as one of 50 projects in the country that has enriched and shaped American lives during the last half century. The National Endowment for the Humanities singled out SHI's efforts to document and revitalize the Tlingit language as part of its 50-year anniversary celebration and is featuring 50 projects on its "Celebrating 50 Years" website that represent the best of the work the agency has funded…( more) (Juneau Empire) (10-7-15)

You can't sell what's not yours
By Josh Logue
Inside Higher Ed
A theology college in Massachusetts is facing scrutiny and a government investigation over allegations that it illegally tried to sell Native American artifacts. The school denies the charges, which involve objects subject to repatriation. Andover Newton Theological School owns a collection of 1,100 artifacts, 150 of which have Native American origins and all of which have been housed at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem for more than 60 years...(more) (10-7-15)

Andover Newton won't sell Native American artifacts
By Jonathan Dame
NewtonTab
Andover Newton Theological School has ditched plans to sell dozens of Native American artifacts amid criticism and an investigation by a federal agency charged with overseeing the repatriation of objects sacred to indigenous nations. The Newton Centre-based graduate school had been planning to sell around 80 artifacts obtained through alumnae donations but now says it plans to return them to Native American tribes after discovering many could be subject to restrictions under federal law…(more) (10-5-15)

Theology college abandons plan to sell tribal art
Boston Globe
A Massachusetts theology college has abandoned plans to sell off art from 52 Native tribes, including Tlingit and Haida items, as the federal government investigates. The Andover Newton Theological School could face penalties for quietly planning the sale of 80 Native art pieces this summer, possibly violating a federal law that would require some items to be returned to the tribes, reported KTOO-FM. The Peabody Essex Museum in Salem has displayed the collection since the 1940s and alerted hundreds of tribal leaders to Andover Newton’s plans. Sealaska Heritage Institute president Rosita Worl was among those leaders. The school intended to auction off a Tlingit halibut hook that Worl said is sacred...(more) (10-5-15)

Theology school calls off Native art sale amid investigation
By Elizabeth Jenkins
KTOO
A Massachusetts college that planned to liquidate its Native art collection has called it off. The pieces are from 52 tribes, including Tlingit and Haida items that might be sacred. Now the country’s oldest theology school could get dinged with penalties as feds investigate…( more) (Juneau Empire) (10-5-15)

Sealaska Heritage Institute honored by the National Endowment for the Humanities
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute’s work on the Tlingit language was chosen by the federal humanities agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities, as one of 50 projects in the country that has enriched and shaped American lives during the last half century. NEH singled out SHI’s efforts to document and revitalize the Tlingit language as part of its 50-year anniversary celebration and is featuring 50 projects on its “Celebrating 50 Years” website that represent the best of the work the agency has funded...(more) (10-4-15)

October First Friday Art Walk
Capital City Weekly
The October First Friday Art Walk marks the end of tourist season with locals appreciation events at several businesses, and highlights new work by locals artists...(more) (Juneau Empire) (9-30-15)

Revitalizing language
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
"Language Matters," a film shown Sept. 17 at the University of Alaska Southeast, frames an important question for Southeast Alaska: What does it take to save a language? To poet Bob Holman, the film's host, who was in Juneau for the screening, that answer is manifold. It takes respect, Holman said - part of the reason many languages are disappearing, after all, is because of the shame their speakers were made to feel about speaking them during and after colonization. It takes a commitment to early education -- it's important people learn the language as children...(more) (9-23-15)

Sale of Sacred Object Stopped By Museum and Native Leaders
By Frank Hopper
Indian Country Today 
Once, Native sacred objects were secure. No one stole them. They were alive with the tribe’s spirit and to steal one was not theft, but kidnapping. Then genocide decimated us and missionaries converted us. Many of our sacred objects fell into the hands of collectors and museums. Now, in the latest round of sacred-object politics, a museum director and a coalition of Native leaders have succeeded in stopping the sale of 80 sacred objects by a private school...( more) (9-18-15)

Singletary's glass house posts installed in Soboleff Building
By Amy Fletcher
Capital City Weekly
How many people does it take to lift a 600-pound, six-foot Tlingit warrior? At least six. And if that warrior happens to be made of glass? As many as you can find. Last week in the clan house (Shuká Hít) of the Walter Soboleff Building, a small group of volunteers helped Tlingit artist Preston Singletary carefully move his latest art pieces – two house posts that depict life-size Tlingit warriors – into their permanent positions on either side of the artist’s glass clan house screen...(more) (Juneau Empire) (9-9-15)

Peck brothers donate collection to SHI archives
Capital City Weekly
A Juneau resident and his brother have made a significant donation to Sealaska Heritage Institute that includes letters and essays penned by the late Native rights leader William L. Paul, Sr., for whom the institute’s archives is named. The donation by Ray Peck of Juneau and Cy Peck, Jr., a former longtime Juneau resident who now lives in Hawaii, includes letters, papers, newspapers, newsletters and more than 200 color and black-and-white images collected by their father, the late Cyrus E. Peck, a former grand president of the Alaska Native Brotherhood and grand secretary emeritus...(more) (Juneau Empire) (9-9-15)

Donation sheds light on Alaska Natives' civil rights history
By Elizabeth Jenkins
KTOO
SHI President Rosita Worl stands over a table of photographs of ancestors in regalia, Alaska Native Brotherhood meetings and less formal gatherings–relaxing around a table for dinner. “Here look at this. ANB people and traditional leaders. Ooo, I see my grandmother over there!” she exclaims. The collection spans from the 1940s all the way to the 70s and was donated by brothers Ray and Cy Peck. The sons of Cyrus Peck Senior, who published the newspaper Voice of the Brotherhood...(more) ( APRN) (9-9-15)

Photo: Clan posts
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Tlingit glass artist Preston Singletary, right, smiles after the first of two house posts he designed for the clan house (Shuká Hít) was raised into position as Jeremy Bosworth prepares its metal brackets at the Walter Soboleff Building Thursday. The posts depict an Eagle (shown) and a Raven warrior, dressed in traditional Tlingit armor. Each 600-pound, six-foot post was created from a single piece of kiln-fired glass...( more) (9-7-15)

Essays, letters of Tlingit leader William Paul donated to Sealaska
By Mike Dunham
Alaska Dispatch News
Letters, essays and other writings by Tlingit leader William L. Paul Sr. collected by the late Cyrus Peck, former grand president of the Alaska Native Brotherhood, have been donated to the Sealaska Heritage Institute by Peck’s sons, Ray and Cy Jr. Paul (1885-1977) was a leader in the movement for Native rights and Alaska self-determination for much of the last century, on the front line of many legal and political battles of the time, said SHI President Rosita Worl....(more) (9-5-15)

September First Friday art walk
Capital City Weekly
Featured artists Rhonda Butler, Renee Culp, and Toni Weber: Walter Soboleff Building, Front and Seward Streets, Reception: 4:30-8 p.m.. Sealaska Heritage Institute and the Sealaska Heritage Store will host featured artists Rhonda Butler, Renee Culp, and Toni Weber at the Walter Soboleff Building. During the First Friday reception, SHI will offer free admission to the exhibit, "Enter the World of the Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian Peoples" and the clan house, Shuká Hít, and the store will offer special discounts...(more)

Tsimshian artist Boxley teaches formline at Juneau jail
By Emily Russo
Capital City Weekly
A group of inmates at the Juneau jail received an incredible opportunity last week — to learn the basics of Northwest Coast art and formline design from the nation’s most renowned Tsimshian artist, David Boxley. Sealaska Heritage Institute asked Boxley, a Metlakatla-born artist who lives in Kingston, Washington, to teach the four-day art class at Lemon Creek Correctional Center while he was in Juneau teaching evening Tsimshian language classes at SHI’s Walter Soboleff Building. “I thought, well, what a nice new adventure,” he said of the offer. “I’ve never been inside any correctional facility before"...( more) (Juneau Empire) (9-2-15)

Learning Sm'algyax
By Mary Catharine Martin
CAPITAL CITY WEEKLY
Every other summer when she was a child, Jerry Ann Gray would visit her maternal grandparents in Metlakatla and listen to them sing Sm'algyax, the language of the Tsimshian people. "It sounds different now than it did then," she said. "Back then, they sound like when they talk, they sing.... I loved listening to my grandparents, because it always sounded like they were singing. I miss that." Gray was one of more than 30 students who during the last week of August attended a Sm'algyax class taught by master carver and culture bearer David Boxley. The class was organized by Nancy Barnes and cosponsored by the Sealaska Heritage Institute and the Haayk Foundation...( more) (Juneau Empire) (The Washington Times) (9-2-15)

A brighter future with the arts
NEA chairwoman spreads message of art's value in all lives
By Paula Ann Solis
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Everyone has a story to tell, and sometimes a paintbrush, a pirouette or a grand piano does the job when words fail. That was the root of a message Jane Chu, chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Arts, carried with her during a stop in Juneau on Tuesday. “The arts allow us to do so much self-expression beyond the use of everyday conversation,” she said. “Everybody has a very special unique way of being engaged with the arts. The arts are thriving"...(more) (9-2-15)

President Obama Renamed Mt. McKinley and Pissed Off Some Ohio Republicans
By Esha Dey
VICE NEWS
America's tallest mountain peak, Mt. McKinley, is getting its old name back. President Barack Obama, who is on a three-day tour of Alaska, highlighting the impacts of climate change, announced on Sunday the restoration of the Alaskan Native name of Denali to the mountain. During his visit to the state, President Obama will meet with leaders from Alaskan native communities, along with Governor Bill Walker and Senator Lisa Murkowski, to discuss ways to strengthen cooperation between the federal government and indigenous groups. Rosita Worl, president of nonprofit group Sealaska Heritage Institute, which works to promote Alaskan native culture, welcomed the name change as a much-needed recognition by the larger American society about the existence of indigenous people...(more) (8-31-15)

Artist teaches formline in prison by day, Tsimshian by night
By Scott Burton
KTOO
Tsimshian artist and teacher David A. Boxley just wrapped a pair of intensive, weeklong workshops on formline design and Tsimshian language in Juneau. He’s been at Lemon Creek Correctional Center teaching formline by day, and at the Walter Soboleff Building teaching Tsimshian language by night. Entering the maximum security prison—with its checkpoints, razor wire barricades, metal detectors and armed guards—it’s hard to imagine an art class. Until you get to the library...( more) (8-28-15)

Boxley leads formline design classes at prison through SHI
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute has invited Washington-based Tsimshian master artist David A. Boxley to teach formline design to inmates this week at Lemon Creek Correctional Center in Juneau. Boxley, an advanced Tsimshian language student, has also been leading language mini-immersion classes in the evenings at the Walter Soboleff Building since Monday. The institute has sponsored formline design classes to connect inmates to their culture and to help them earn a living upon release, said SHI President Rosita Worl in a release...(more) (8-26-15)

Photo: Tsimshian Language
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Washington-based Tsimshian master artist David A. Boxley teaches a Tsimshian language mini-immersion class at the Walter Soboleff Building on Monday. Sealaska Heritage Institute is co-sponsoring the evening language classes, which were organized by Nancy Barnes. Haayk Foundation also is a co-sponsor...(more) (8-26-15)

Tsimshian language course next week
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Language teacher and master carver David Boxley will host a four-evening “mini immersion” class in Sm’algyax, the language of the Tsimshian, from Monday through Thursday. The course runs 6-9 p.m. each night at the Walter Soboleff Building and is cosponsored by the Haayk Foundation and Sealaska Heritage Institute. The class is free and open to the public, but advance sign-ups are requested. Contact Nancy Barnes at nbarnes@hunatotem.com or call/text 957-4588...(more) (8-19-15)

Visiting lecturer tracks 'gun frontier' through Southeast Alaska
By James Brooks
JUNEAU EMPIRE
There are plenty of ways to buy guns in Juneau. Stores sell them. Individuals sell them. There’s even a Facebook group devoted to buying and selling guns and ammunition in Juneau. But what was the first gun in Juneau? How about Southeast Alaska? On Tuesday, George Washington University professor David Silverman explained in a lecture at the Sealaska Heritage Institute that he’s on a quest to answer those very questions. For the past five years, Silverman has been researching material for a book that tracks what he calls the “gun frontier” — the way firearms spread across North America and were incorporated into American Indian and Alaska Native cultures...(more) (8-16-15)

Sprouting totems, blossoming Haida culture in Southeast Alaska
By Paula Dobbyn
Alaska Dispatch News
HYDABURG -- Chain saws toppled a 550-year-old western red cedar tree on Prince of Wales Island recently. But last month, the ancient log rose again as Eagle and Raven totem poles in the village of Hydaburg. Hydaburg, a rainforest town of 400 on Prince of Wales Island in Southeast Alaska, is on a mission. It’s leading a resurgence in Haida culture, churning out new totem poles, running a carving school and designing a traditional long house. What’s happening here is part of a wave of cultural revitalization projects sweeping Alaska’s Panhandle...( more) (8-16-15)

Gathering Immersed in Tlingit
Sitka Sentinel
The first Tlingit language immersion program has ended after a week of activities in Sitka. The Sitka Sentinel reports that things wrapped up Saturday for the 63 language speakers that traveled from across Alaska, Canada and the lower 48 to attend the workshops. Program organizer Heather Powell says there are only about 100 Tlingit speakers total...(more) (Associated Press) (News Miner) (Washington Times) ( KTOO) (KINY) (8-9-15)

SHI to sponsor two lectures in August
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor two free lectures during the first two weeks of August. On Friday, Aug. 7, Michael Taylor, a Ph.D. candidate in English and First Nations Studies at the University of British Columbia, will present "Onward Christian Soldiers: Situating the Writings of the Alaska Native Brotherhood/Sisterhood within a Longstanding Indigenous Literary Tradition." In his research, Taylor argues that the current record of Alaska Native literature is divided into two categories: traditional oral literature and post-1960s fiction and poetry...(  more) (Juneau Empire) (8-5-15)

Teaching formline
By Amy Fletcher
Capital City Weekly
This week, Sealaska Heritage Institute released the results of a three-year project designed to help students learn the basics of formline -- the design elements around which most Northwest Coast Native art is built. The in-depth educational resource, designed for students in grades 5-8, was introduced to teachers from around the state Monday by Juneau School District art teacher Nancy Lehnhart during the 10th annual Basic Arts Institute at the University of Alaska Southeast on Monday....(more) (Juneau Empire) (7-29-15)

SHI to sponsor annual Latseen Hoop Camp
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor its annual Latseen Hoop Camp in Juneau in August and feature Bob Saviers, a current coach for Juneau's Hoop Time Amateur Athletic Union. The Latseen Hoop Camp is a free program that provides a safe environment for youth to be physically active, develop basketball fundamentals and learn the Tlingit language. The camp is for students in grades 3-8 and is scheduled 8 a.m.- 5 p.m., Aug. 10-13; the location is still to be determined. Students may register online...(more) (Juneau Empire) (7-22-15)

Sale of Native art by Andover Newton Theological School under fire
By Jenna Fisher
Newton Tab
Should a private institution be allowed to sell a private art collection — filled with items of cultural and religious significance to members of Native American tribes in Alaska and Hawaii — for profit? When it comes to the future of one Newton college’s collection, the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem and at least one Native Alaskan activist don’t think so. They are asking the school to reconsider selling. Andover Newton Theological School said after decades of owning a private collection with some 1,100 items for decades, it is time to part ways with about 80 pieces of it...(more) (7-16-15)

Traveling exhibition on Native concepts of health and illness opens
Capital City Weekly
A new traveling exhibition, "Native Voices: Native Peoples' Concepts of Health and Illness," which examines concepts of health and medicine among contemporary American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian people, has opened in Juneau. The display, produced by the National Library of Medicine, explores the connection between wellness, illness, and cultural life through a combination of interviews with Native people, artwork, objects, and interactive media. The free exhibition opened in the Sealaska lobby and will be available to the public from 7:30 am-5:30 p.m., Monday-Friday through Sept. 7. Sealaska Heritage Institute helped coordinate the event, said SHI President Rosita Worl...(more) (Juneau Empire) (7-15-15)

East Coast theology school selling off Alaska Native art, feds to investigate
By Elizabeth Jenkins
KTOO
At Sealaska Heritage Institute, culture and history director Chuck Smythe walks down a flight of cedar steps to the basement, the place where Native artifacts are kept. Behind a locked door are some of the pieces in the collection. We are going into the conservation room. You hear the freezer going, he says. Items that arrive at the institute are cooled to 40 below to kill insects before the pieces go into long-term storage in a temperature controlled room. Smythe shows me a Southeast Native tunic, probably from the 20th century. It is a green tunic with red border and it has flowers and designs...( more) (7-2-15)

July First Friday Art Walk
Capital City Weekly
Highlights of this month's art walk include a birthday party for Annie Kaill's featuring a visit by Kaill herself, artwork and dancing at the Soboleff Center, and a furniture and art show by Toby Harbanuk at the JAHC Gallery....(more) (7-1-15)

Other Native groups join FedEx boycott
By Melissa Griffiths
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Following news that Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska will boycott shipping giant FedEx, a major sponsor of a National Football League team in Washington, D.C., whose name is considered by many to be derogatory to Native Americans, other organizations in Southeast Alaska are piling on. Sealaska Heritage Institute President Rosita Worl said last week the nonprofit cultural organization will discontinue use of FedEx for shipping. We will follow suit, Worl said. It's that pebble, you know, that Richard (Peterson) threw out starting to make waves. Sealaska Corporation, Southeast Alaska's regional Native corporation, said it would also choose other shipping options. Worl sits on the SHI board of directors...(more) (6-30-15)

SHI free lectures: Native place names and repatriation of headdress
KINY
By Lori James
Sealaska Heritage will sponsor a free lecture by a visiting scholar on Native place names in Southeast Alaska, particularly those that incorporate Native words for yellow and red cedar on Monday. The lecture by Felipe Vasquez, a graduate student at the University of Kent, is based on his ethnobotanical study of toponyms--lace names derived from topographical features in the region. In his research proposal, Vasquez argues that traditional ecological knowledge is seen as both cultural heritage to be treasured and practical site-specific knowledge that could help humans adapt to climate change...(more) (6-29-15)

Lecture shares stories in cedar
JUNEAU EMPIRE
A graduate student visiting Southeast Alaska from the University of Kent will share his work studying names in the region that incorporate Native words for cedar. The lecture takes place at noon today in the Walter Soboleff Building. In a research proposal explained by Sealaska Heritage Institute, Felipe Vasquez argues that traditional ecological knowledge could help humans adapt to climate change...(more) (6-29-15)

SHI lecture will share story of returned headdress
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage will present a free lecture from a French anthropologist and visiting scholar at noon Wednesday in the Walter Soboleff Building. The lecture by Marie Mauze, Ph.D., will tell the story of how a British Columbia headdress belonging to the Kwakwak™awakw was repatriated in 2003...( more) (6-29-15)

SHI seeking investigation of Native art sale
Collection contains several items from Southeast tribes
By Melissa Griffiths
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute President Rosita Worl has called for a federal investigation into the sale of a collection of Native American art, including several pieces from Southeast Alaska tribes. Worl heard about two weeks ago of the sale of a collection of art owned by the Andover Newton Theological School, including about 125 pieces of Native American art representing 52 tribes, some of which are known to be of Tlingit and Haida origin. Dan Monroe, president and CEO of the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, and a colleague of Worl's, notified SHI and other tribal organizations of the sale...( more) (6-28-15)

Scholar to give lecture on Kwakwak'awakw headdress repatriation
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage will sponsor a free lecture by French anthropologist and visiting scholar Marie Mauze on the repatriation of a British Columbia headdress in 2003. The lecture will focus on a Kwakwak'awakw headdress that was acquired in 1965 by French poet Andree Breton and repatriated to the U'Mista Culture Centre (Alert Bay). Mauze, an anthropologist with the College de France, was instrumental in its return...(more) (6-24-15)

Sealaska Heritage to hold cultural performing arts intensive
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute is recruiting students for a Cultural Performing Arts Intensive through its Voices on the Land program in Juneau. The project taps traditional and performing arts to increase literacy skills and student engagement. Native students in 4-5 grades and middle schools will be working to improve storytelling skills with actors James Sullivan, Frank Katasse and Katrina Hotch. Students will practice Tlingit language, play theater games and work with a cultural specialist...(more) (6-24-15)

SHI to host lecture on Native place names
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage will sponsor a free lecture by a visiting scholar on Native place names in Southeast Alaska, particularly those that incorporate Native words for yellow and red cedar. The lecture by Felipe Vasquez, a graduate student at the University of Kent, is based on his ethnobotanical study of toponyms - place names derived from topographical features -- in the region. In his research proposal, Vasquez argues that traditional ecological knowledge is seen as both cultural heritage to be treasured and practical site-specific knowledge that could help humans adapt to climate change....(more) (6-24-15)

Photo: Formline workshop
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Lance Twitchell conducts a formline design workshop at the Living History Center in the Walter Soboleff Building on Tuesday, June 16. The free workshop was organized through Sealaska Heritage Institute's Jineit Art Academy as part of a series of regional programs designed to help artists at all levels learn and enhance their formline, a term that describes the complex designs that make up the underlying components of Northwest Coast art. The workshops, offered in 10 communities throughout the month of June, are also designed to increase the number of Native artists and art instructors qualified to teach Northwest Coast art in public schools...( more) (6-17-15)

Hoonah student chosen for Judson Brown Scholarship
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute has chosen a Hoonah student as the 2015 recipient of the Judson L. Brown Leadership Award. The recipient, Amelia œTlaagoonk Wilson, is a Chookaneidi (Eagle/Bear), Kaach.adi Yadi (Child of the Raven/Land Otter). She is pursuing a master'™s degree in rural development at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, College of Rural and Community Development. The $5,000 scholarship goes to students who have demonstrated academic achievement and leadership skills, said SHI President Rosita Worl, adding only one person wins the annual award...( more) (6-17-15)

Touching the past through running
Native youth camp adds a deeper insight into culture
By Klas Stolpe
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Glancing sideways, her arms pulling strongly forward and back in opposite motions to her legs, DzantikI Heeni sixth-grader Ellysiem Paine smiled as runners passed her on an Eaglecrest uphill sprint. "œI like joining running but sometimes I am a little slow," Paine said. "œI just try to push myself so I can be faster. Sometimes I am behind and the coaches help me push myself." Paine was taking part in last week'™s Sealaska Heritage Latseen Running Camp...( more) (6-17-15)

SHI goes local in effort to enhance Northwest Coast art
By Emily Files
KHNS
Sealaska Heritage Institute is working to strengthen Northwest Coast art in Southeast Alaska. Right now, SHI representatives are touring ten communities to gather ideas from local people about enhancing Native arts. That is happening in conjunction with an initiative that sponsors formline design classes in Southeast. Tlingit master carver Wayne Price was the teacher for a SHI-sponsored formline class in Haines last week. He taught about a dozen locals in the traditional artwork of Northwest Coast Natives. Formline design is the distinguishing feature of Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian artwork. It describes the curving lines that create shapes you see in carvings, weavings, and drawings. Price told his students about the first time he saw carvers using formline design. "I didn't have a clue what it meant but I knew I really liked it," he said. "It wasn'™t too long for me to figure out it was going to be the destiny of my life. 45 years later I have had not one day of regret"...( more) (6-10-15)

'Every Voice Matters'
StoryCorps project records stories of Alaska Native education experiences
By Katie Spielberger
Capital City Weekly
A new oral history project at the Juneau Public Library is inviting people of all ages to share stories around the theme of Alaska Native educational experiences. The Juneau Public Library is one of 10 libraries selected from more than 300 applicants nationwide to participate in the StoryCorps project, which will record community stories around specific themes over the next few months. The selected libraries, chosen through a peer-review process, will receive grant funding, training and equipment. Juneau Public Library program coordinator Beth Weigel and community outreach librarian Andi Hirsh are organizing the Juneau project...( more) (6-3-15)

Tlingit language immersion program co-founder Kitty Eddy retires after 31 years
By Scott Burton
KTOO
It's the last day of class in Eddy'™s combined kindergarten and first grade classroom. You would think it would be hard to gather the students, but it just takes to the count of five  in Tlingit. "Keijin. Daax’oon. Nas ‘k. Deiy. Tleix’!” Eddy says in a patient yet stern manner as the students move to the front of the class to sing and dance. The program, which began in 2000 with help from a federal grant, is a collaboration between Sealaska Heritage Institute and the Juneau School District. The two founding teachers were Eddy and Nancy Douglas...( more) (5-29-15)

Conversation with Rosita Worl
By Rhonda McBride
KTVA--Frontiers
On the Sunday, May 24 episode of Frontiers, Rhonda McBride talks with Rosita Worl about the opening of the Walter Soboleff Center in Juneau, a new cultural mecca for Alaska Natives of Southeast Alaska. Worl, president and CEO of the Sealaska Heritage Institute, shares her memories of the late Walter Soboleff, the namesake of the new heritage center, who lived to be 102. Worl also talks about the ancient traditions celebrated at the opening, including the arrival of a canoe at the Juneau dock and the naming of the clan house inside the center...(more) (5-24-15)

Baby Raven Reads fosters next generation of Tlingit speakers
By Lisa Phu
KTOO
Families and young children mill around tables in the lobby of the Walter Soboleff Building. There is a station for coloring, one for science. Margaret Katzeek and her 2-year-old niece Elayna are at the snack table. "Do you want some water?" Katzeek asks Elayna. "œDo you remember what it i™s called? Heen. Let's say heen." This is their second Baby Raven Reads family night. The free early childhood program run by Sealaska Heritage Institute builds on the strengths of Alaska Native culture in teaching early literacy. Katzeek says they are a fun way to learn the Tlingit language, for her niece and herself. "They say the best way to learn something and get to know something is trying to teach it," she says, So I definitely work on the words that I do know, I work with her on it lot"...( more) (5-21-15) (APRN)

More than a building
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
To the many speakers and attendees at its May 15 opening ceremonies, the Walter Soboleff Building is a work of art, a home for culture, and a powerful symbol of Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian people's perseverance and strength. It's also a fitting tribute to Dr. Walter Soboleff, an ordained Presbyterian minister who passed away in 2011 at the age of 102, inspired many in Southeast Alaska with his Sunday morning radio broadcasts, and worked to cultivate Alaska Native pride at a time it was much needed."He taught us the word of God, but... he also taught us the word of respect for our culture," said speaker Bill Thomas, who loaned historic Tlingit regalia to the building's museum....( more) (5-20-15)

'Monumental' art unveiled at Soboleff Building
By Amy Fletcher
Capital City Weekly
The three art pieces created for the Water Soboleff Building were described by Sealaska Heritage Institute as "monumental," an adjective that applies not only to their size -- all three are believed to be the biggest of their kind in the world -- but to their significance and stature: each one represents a major new work by an internationally recognized master artist and is an important addition to Juneau artistic landscape. More than art pieces for the cultures they represent (see related story below), the works are an integral and permanent part of the new arts and cultural center, and are reflective of the center's dual goal of honoring tradition while supporting Northwest Coast Native art's continuing evolution. Two of the pieces use unusual mediums -- one metal, one glass -- and abstract designs, while the third is based on historical examples of formline and is rendered in cedar, a traditional material....( more) (5-20-15)

Northwest Coast Native art: An 'overt manifestation of culture'
By Amy Fletcher
Capital City Weekly
Northwest Coast Native art isn't the only focus of the new Walter Soboleff Building, but it's likely to be the aspect that draws in the most visitors. For non-Natives hoping to gain a better understanding of Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian cultures, the artwork is a good place to start, offering an introduction to foundational concepts such as balance and harmony. Traditionally, art was such an integral part of the culture that there was no word for it in the Tlingit vocabulary, said SHI president Rosita Worl in a recent interview."What we would call art, it would be in Tlingit 'at.oow,' an owned or purchased thing, it's a clan treasure," she said. "It's related to our social organization and reflects our spiritual beliefs ... it speaks to the relationship that we have to the environment, the relationship that we have to animals. But that is not to say we don't appreciate good art ... Even in the traditional periods, they knew what was good work."...(more) (5-20-15)

Photos: Grand opening: Walter Soboleff Building, May 15
Capital City Weekly
Tlingit artist Preston Singletary, right, takes part in the dedication ceremony of his glass clan house screen in the clan house of the Walter Soboleff Building during the grand opening Friday in Juneau, with Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian attendees, dressed in their regalia...( more) (5-20-15)

A 'great day for Alaska'
Hundreds gather to celebrate dedication of Walter Soboleff Building
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
A glorious spring day provided the backdrop for the grand opening of the Walter Soboleff Building Friday as a crowd of hundreds gathered to mark the dedication of a major new Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian cultural facility in downtown Juneau. Attendees, many dressed in colorful regalia--yellow and green Chilkat robes and blue and red button blankets--celebrated with dancing, singing and formal speeches and oratory that emphasized the building'™s role in supporting the ongoing vitality of Northwest Coast Native art and culture...(more) (5-17-15)

Slideshow: Soboleff Center grand opening
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
(5-15-15)

Walter Soboleff Center opens in Juneau as a hub for Southeast Native culture
Pat Forgey
Alaska Dispatch News
Sealaska Heritage Institute dedicated its gleaming new Walter Soboleff Center on Friday, bringing to life a $20 million dream that it took a decade to complete. The new cultural center will do something unusual in the world of art and museums -- it will feature the story of Alaska's Native people being told by Alaska Natives themselves. "This building is much more than a physical facility," said Rosita Worl, president of Sealaska Heritage. "It symbolizes the effort of Native people to ensure our cultural survival, but at the same time selectively embrace the benefits of our modern society." With the building now complete, the irony of the building's design nearly being stopped by the city of Juneau's historic preservation ordinance now seems just a humorous aside...(more) (5-15-15)

Walter Soboleff Building opens in Juneau with revelry, remembrance
By Channel 2 News staff
KTUU
The opening of the Sealaska Heritage Institute'™s Walter Soboleff Center in Juneau took up a full city block Friday and featured a grand ceremony. The Angoon Children Dancers chanted, drummed and danced on Seward Street in front of the building. They were chosen because many of the children in the group are from Angoon, hometown of the late Dr. Walter Soboleff. Many of the dancers are from the same clan as or descendants of Soboleff, the first Alaska Native to serve on the state Board of Education who also served as director of Sealaska Corporation. He passed away in 2011 at the age of 102. On Friday, Soboleff's son Sasha gave the opening prayer. He urged people not to forget what his father stood for...( more) (5-16-15)

Sacred architecture: Walter Soboleff Building opens its doors
By Elizabeth Jenkins
KTOO
The Sealaska Heritage Institute unveiled its new structure in downtown Juneau today. It is called the Walter Soboleff Building after the late Tlingit scholar, elder and religious leader. Inside stands a full-sized replica of a traditional red cedar clan house. At the opening ceremony, the Aangun Yatx™i dance in their regalia in front of the Walter Soboleff building. Davina Cole is the arts assistant here. She clutches her four-month-old baby girl tightly to her chest. "We are Yanyeidi rom the T'aaku Kwaan area. We are little wolves. She is my baby pup," she says. Cole says she i™s looking forward to what the Soboleff Building will offer her daughter. They have already gone to a Baby Raven Reads class before the grand opening. It teaches pre-literacy through Native stories...( more) (5-15-15)

Video: Preston Singletary's monumental glass screen
By Scott Burton
KTOO
Tlingit glass artist Preston Singletary was chosen as one of three people to contribute monumental art to Sealaska Heritage Institute's new Walter Soboleff Building. In this video he explains the inspiration for his glass screen and his take on contemporary indigenous art...( more) (5-15-15)

Sealaska opens Walter Soboleff Building, plans park featuring Native artists
By Lance David
KINY
The Sealaska Heritage Institute conducted a grand opening of its Walter Soboleff Building in downtown Juneau last week. Prior to the grand opening, Institute President Rosita Worl said on Action Line that phase two is already in the works, explaining, "I've been telling people that I really believe Juneau can become the Northwest's art capital, so we're pursuing a number of different programs to integrate art into everything. Phase two will be a native artists' park. I feel like Juneau is deserving of something spectacular with native art in park. We may have to push Sealaska off their parking lot and build them another"...( more) (5-15-15)

Time Lapse Video: Preston Singletary's Glass Screen for Walter Soboleff Building's Clan House
(5-15-15)

Sealaska Heritage Institute conducts grand opening of Walter Soboleff Building
By Lori James
KINY
Rosita Worl, the institute's president, talked of the two ceremonies, "What we found out is that we needed to have two separate ceremonies. We actually have a formal ceremony, where we're going to be acknowledging our great officials here in Juneau, but in this part of the ceremony we also have to have our ceremonial spokespeople welcoming the people. So in that morning session it will be opened up with the Children of Angoon dancing and then we'll have the formal ceremony. Then right after that we will then move to the dock, we'll have a dance precession. We'll meet the canoe group coming from Hanes and Klukwan. At the marine park we will have a number of dances. Then we'll have another procession right back to the center of the building where we begin our traditional ceremony"...( more) (5-15-15)

Out of the ashes: A downtown eyesore is transformed
By Jeremy Hsieh
KTOO
In 2004, an awning patch-job went bad and led to a fire that razed a historic commercial building in the heart of downtown Juneau, where the grand opening of Sealaska Heritage Institute'™s Walter Soboleff Building will happen Friday. In its 108-year history, the two-story, wood-framed building at the corner of Front and Seward streets had gone by many names: The C.W. Young Building, Rusher'™s Hardware, the Skinner Building, the Endicott Building and the Town Center Mall...(more) (5-14-15)

Monumental art makes Juneau's new Walter Soboleff Building shine
By Scott Burton
KTOO
The new Walter Soboleff Building in downtown Juneau will soon be fully unveiled to the public. In addition to observing the structure'™s architecture, visitors will be surrounded by monumental art.Rosita Worl says she wanted both traditional and contemporary art. Rosita Worl says she wanted both traditional and contemporary art. "We knew we wanted to have the best of our artwork," says Sealaska Heritage Institute President Rosita Worl. "And we also knew we wanted to have all of our three nations represented: the Tlingit, Haida and the Tsimshians." By "we" she means the institute'™s Native Artist Committee: Tlingit artist Nathan Jackson, master Haida weaver Delores Churchill, Tlingit contemporary artist Nicholas Galanin and formline expert Steve Brown. They solicited art, deliberated over the proposals and chose three. But what is monumental art?...(more) (5-14-15)

Soboleff Center opening brings visitors by canoe
North Tide Canoe Kwaan from Haines arrived in Juneau on Wednesday
By Melissa Griffiths
JUNEAU EMPIRE
They just landed in Juneau on Wednesday and, boy, were their arms tired. That is because members of the North Tide Canoe Kwaan didn'™t fly or ferry in like many other visitors arriving to celebrate Sealaska Heritage Institute'™s new Walter  Soboleff Center grand opening -- they paddled...( more) (5-14-15)

Tlingit civil rights hero William Paul Sr. remembered
By Amy Fletcher
CAPITAL CITY WEEKLY
Juneau residents gathered to share their memories and impressions of Tlingit civil rights activist and lawyer William Paul Sr. last week on what would have been Paul'™s 130th birthday, May 7, one week before Sealaska Heritage Institute's May 15 dedication of the Walter Soboleff Building'™s archives facility in his name. The meeting, organized by local lawyer and researcher Kathy Ruddy for the second year in a row, welcomed input from about a dozen participants, some of whom knew Paul personally, with a larger goal of bringing recognition to Paul'™s contributions to Alaska history. Though not yet a household name in Alaska, Paul is recognized by scholars as a pivotal figure in the history of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971, and was the first Native attorney in Alaska, as well as the first Native legislator. An early member of the Alaska Native Brotherhood, the country's first Native civil rights organization, he worked to secure a wide range of civil rights for Alaska Natives beginning in 1920, including voting, citizenship, fishing and school desegregation...(more) (Juneau Empire)

Grand opening of Soboleff Building set for Friday
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute will kick off a Grand Opening Ceremony for the Walter Soboleff Building at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, May 15 in front of the building on Seward St. with a formal ceremony, which will be followed by a canoe welcome, then a traditional ceremony, scheduled to begin at 2 p.m. The Sealaska parking lot will be set aside for spectators, and the event will be broadcast live on  360North and on sealaskaheritage.org. SHI's Council of Traditional Scholars, which guides the SHI on programs, has been meeting since 2014 to help plan the Grand Opening Ceremony. The day will mark years of planning, fundraising and finally the completion of the new building, said SHI President Rosita Worl...( more) (5-13-15)

Mending the tattered tapestry of Alaska Native languages
KTVA-TV
Only a generation ago, teachers tried to shame Alaska Native children into silence. In this week'™s Frontiers, Marie Rexford of Kaktovik recalls how teachers slapped her hand with a ruler for speaking in Inupiat. David Katzeek, a Tlingit educator now living in Juneau, remembers how a teacher would force children to stretch out their arms and hold heavy rocks in each hand when they were caught speaking in their Native language. Katzeek, now 72, was 8 years old at the time. He says he complied with the teacher'™s directive, because he was taught by his elders to be respectful. He coped by making a game out of holding the rocks and using his imagination to escape...( more) (5-8-15)

Office d'art: No detail spared in Sealaska Heritage Institute's new space
SHI unveils Soboleff Center to public on May 15
By MELISSA GRIFFITHS
JUNEAU EMPIRE
What most people will see of the Walter Soboleff Center is art --” including the building's exterior, a lavish gift shop, formline carvings adorning an interior longhouse and exhibits of cultural objects and art -- but an artistic aesthetic has dictated the form and function of the center down to the smallest detail and up to the highest offices. During a sneak preview of the new building, Lee Kadinger, Sealaska Heritage Institute'™s chief of operations, provided a tour of the spaces beyond the ground floor, where art is abundant and obvious. "œAny place we could add art that typically you don'™t find it, we wanted to," he said...( more) (5-11-15)

SHI prepares for grand opening of Soboleff building
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute will host the grand opening of the Walter Soboleff Building on Friday, May 15, in Juneau. A day of ceremonies and celebration is planned and all are welcome. The ceremony begins at 8:30 a.m. with a formal program of comments and recognitions from dignitaries and special guests. At 12:30 p.m., there will be a coming ashore and welcome ceremony at the Marine Park dock marking the arrival of North Tide Canoe Kwaan, followed by dance group performances. The canoe paddlers and dancers will then proceed to the Soboleff Center...( more) (5-7-15)

SHI prepares for grand opening of Soboleff building
CAPITAL CITY WEEKLY
Sealaska Heritage Institute will host the grand opening of the Walter Soboleff Building on Friday, May 15, in Juneau. A day of ceremonies and celebration is planned and all are welcome. The ceremony begins at 8:30 a.m. with a formal program of comments and recognitions from dignitaries and special guests. At 12:30 p.m., there will be a coming ashore and welcome ceremony at the Marine Park dock marking the arrival of North Tide Canoe Kwaan, followed by dance group performances. The canoe paddlers and dancers will then proceed to the Soboleff Center...( more) (5-6-15)

JSD replaces texts that spurred protests
Replacement documents tell stories of Native experience
By Melissa Griffiths
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Companion texts from the Juneau School District'™s new Reading Wonders curriculum that were criticized for their sugarcoated portrayal of Native experiences have been replaced, the school district announced. Teacher Shgen George had an emotional reaction when she discovered new books in her classroom depicting a young Native American girl at a boarding school and a young Native American boy removed from his home, walking the Trail of Tears. "œMy immediate reaction was I just felt so trivialized," George said...(more) (4-9-15)

SHI to sponsor Latseen Leadership Academy July 6-9
Capital City Weekly
Applications are now available for Sealaska Heritage Institute's annual Latseen Leadership Academy program. This year's academy for high school students will be held July 6-19 at the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau. The academy will serve 40 high school students from Angoon, Prince of Wales, Klukwan and Juneau. Travel scholarships are available. Yees Shaade Nakx'l Yaan (New Young Leaders) is designed to provide engaging culturally-based education and activities for high school students in support of their future academic and personal success with a focus on rigor, relevance, and relationships...(more) (4-8-15)

Sealaska makes use of new clan house in Soboleff Center
By Mary Catharine Martin
Alaska Dispatch News 
JUNEAU -- Sealaska Heritage Foundation at the end of March made apt first use of the clan house in the new Walter Soboleff Center: as a place to focus on children for a new three-year pre-literacy and school readiness program, Baby Raven Reads. "It's fitting the first group in this building is the children, who get to grow up in this place," said an initial speaker, adding that organizers had conducted a cleansing and blessing ceremony that afternoon. Music played in the background as families arrived at the room, which smelled of fresh cedar. Kids walked along the differently hued planks as if they were balance beams...(more) (4-5-15)

Baby Raven Reads ... and sings, dances and tells stories
By Mary Catharine Martin
JUNEAU EMPIRE 
Sealaska Heritage Institute at the end of March made apt first use of the clan house in the new Walter Soboleff Center: as a place to focus on children for a new three-year pre-literacy and school readiness program, Baby Raven Reads. "It is fitting the first group in this building is the children, who get to grow up in this place," said an initial speaker, adding that organizers had conducted a cleansing and blessing ceremony that afternoon...(more) (4-1-15)

Baby Raven Reads ... and sings, dances and tells stories
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute at the end of March made apt first use of the clan house in the new Walter Soboleff Center: as a place to focus on children for a new three-year pre-literacy and school readiness program, Baby Raven Reads. "It is fitting the first group in this building is the children, who get to grow up in this place," said an initial speaker, adding that organizers had conducted a cleansing and blessing ceremony that afternoon...(more) (4-1-15)

SHI to sponsor first family night for Baby Raven Reads
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor a family night for Alaska Native families with children ages 0-5. This free event is part of SHI's Baby Raven Reads program, which promotes pre-literacy, language development and school readiness. Families are invited to join us for storytelling, songs and other cultural activities. Family night will be held on Wednesday, March 25 from 5pm-6:30 p.m. at the Walter Soboleff Building...(more) (3-25-15)

Juneau library to launch Alaska Native oral history project
Capital City Weekly
The Juneau Public Library system will collect stories by Alaska Natives about their educational experiences for an oral history project. The library is among 10 selected from more than 300 applicants across the nation for the oral history project through StoryCorps , a nonprofit whose mission is to promote an "understanding that everyone's story matters."... The interviews will be archived locally at the library and the Sealaska Heritage Institute...(more) (3-25-15)

Photos: Six months in the making
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Tsimshian carver David Boxley, of Metlakatla, explains the formline design on the cedar panels to Sealaska Heritage Institutes' Nobu Koch and Kari Groven, right, as work to install the Tsimshian house front at the Walter Soboleff Center started on Monday. Boxley and his son, David Robert Boxley, left, spent six months carving and painting the panels that will greet visitors to the center...(more) (3-10-15)

Art Beat: Giant glass in Juneau, mystery dinner in the Valley
By Mike Dunham
Alaska Dispatch News
We recently got our first peek at what is said to be the largest glass screen in the world. At 17 feet wide and 12 feet high, that seems like a credible claim. Note the term "screen" here means a full-wall frieze found in traditional Northwest Indian clan houses, made out of cedar in years past. This screen, however, will be by glass artist Preston Singletary and will adorn the clan house inside the new Walter Soboleff Building now under construction in Juneau. Sealaska Heritage Institute sent us a sketch of the screen. The real deal will be unveiled when the building opens on May 15...(more) (3-8-15)

Carving facility hosts first crafts class
By Dan Rudy
Wrangell Sentinel
All of last weekend, the first of what is intended to be many cultural courses was held at Wrangell Cooperative Association's new carving facility, which was finished last autumn. From Thursday afternoon through Sunday, local Native residents were shown how to craft with sea otter pelts by Jeremiah James, operator of Yakutat Furs since 2010. "This is the ninth class I've done," James explained, and the second he has delivered in Wrangell. It was his first time working in the new facility however, and he was impressed. "What an awesome building to be in," he commented. In particular, he said the combination of overhead and natural lighting had been helpful...(more) (3-5-15)

SHI chooses apprentices to make, install monumental glass piece
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute has chosen five apprentices to help create and install a massive glass screen for the new Walter Soboleff Building in Juneau. Three of the apprentices will help glass artist Preston Singletary make the screen at his studio in Seattle in March...(more) (3-5-15)

SHI chooses apprentices to make, install monumental glass piece
CAPITAL CITY WEEKLY
Sealaska Heritage Institute has chosen five apprentices to help create and install a massive glass screen for the new Walter Soboleff Building in Juneau. Three of the apprentices will help glass artist Preston Singletary make the screen at his studio in Seattle in March. The other two will help Singletary install it in the clan house inside the new building in May. The piece will be unveiled to the public at the grand opening on May 15. The people chosen to help Singletary make the screen are...(more) (3-4-15)

Otter hide sewing is first class held in Wrangell's carving facility
By Katarina Sostaric
KSTK News
Wrangell'™s new carving facility hosted its first Alaska Native craft class last weekend, and about 20 residents signed up to learn the basics of sewing otter skins. On a Sunday afternoon, the carving facility was full of people quietly working on their sewing projects. They were hand-sewing sea otter skins to make hats, mittens, headbands, pillows and capes. Arthur Larsen was sewing a bomber hat, which will have flaps to cover his ears. "It is my first time in a class, and it is a really good experience," Larsen said...(more) (3-3-15)

Photo: Moving Sealaska's treasures
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Chuck Smythe, Culture and History Director for the Sealaska Heritage Institute, watches Jon Loring, left, place a spruce root basket from SHI's collection into a protective mount for transport and storage on Tuesday. SHI is moving their collection to the vault in the new Walter Soboleff Center this week. Lorings work is being paid by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities...(more) (2-25-15)

Tlingit masks on "Antiques Roadshow" draw questions from Southeast Alaska
By Margaret Friedenauer
KHNS
recent episode of the popular PBS show "œAntiques Roadshow" caught the attention of some Southeast residents when a couple of 200-year-old Tlingit masks from Haines appeared on screen. It sparked the interests of regional Natives and historians and raised questions about how the items left the area. Fans of Antiques Roadshow wait for those moments when an item on the program is valued at tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars. The TV cameras catch the owner'™s stunned reaction when they hear their family heirloom is worth more than they imagined. That i™s what happened recently during an episode of the show that was filmed in Bismarck, North Dakota...(more) (2-19-15)

Governor's Awards photos
JUNEAU EMPIRE
The Alaska State Council on the Arts and the Alaska Humanities Forum honored nine Alaskans last week at the 2015 Governor'™s Awards for the Arts and Humanities ceremony at the Juneau Arts & Culture Center. In addition to the four Arts awardees and the four Humanities awardees, the Alaska State Council on the Arts announced Frank Soos of Fairbanks as the 2014-2016 Alaska State Writer Laureate, replacing Nora Marks Dauenhauer of Juneau. The 2015 awardees are...(more) (2-4-15)

A big night in the Arts
By Amy Fletcher
Capital City Weekly
If creative energy showed up as visible light, the glow emanating from the Juneau Arts & Culture Center Thursday night would easily be bright enough to be seen by passing satellites in space. The Governor's Awards for the Arts and Humanities ceremony, scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 29, will bring together Alaskan artists, educators and humanitarians of many different types. Some will be honored with awards, others will perform in celebration of the first group's wide-ranging contributions to the state. Southeast artists and humanitarians will be well represented as both honorees and performers; recipients of this year's nine awards include the nonprofit Sealaska Heritage Institute, which will be honored with the Alaska Native Arts award...(more) (1-28-15)

SHI launches program to teach literacy skills through the arts
JUNEAU EMPIRE 
Sealaska Heritage Institute has launched a new program this month to improve literacy skills and increase use of the Tlingit language through performing arts and digital storytelling. The program, Voices on the Land, will integrate performing arts and digital storytelling into six Juneau schools over three years through artists in residence, digital storytelling and a teacher training academy. The first component - the artists in residence program - launched in January 2015 at Gastineau Elementary, Harborview Elementary and Dzantik'I Heeni Middle School...(more) (1-29-15)

SHI launches program to teach literacy skills through the arts
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute has launched a new program this month to improve literacy skills and increase use of the Tlingit language through performing arts and digital storytelling. The program, Voices on the Land, will integrate performing arts and digital storytelling into six Juneau schools over three years through artists in residence, digital storytelling and a teacher training academy. The first component --” the artists in residence program -- launched in January 2015 at Gastineau Elementary, Harborview Elementary and Dzantiki Heeni Middle School...(more) (1-28-15)

A day in the life of: Kinkaduneek Paul Marks
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
Tlingit elder and storyteller Paul Marks teaches, carves, and translates. But one of the most important aspects of being Tlingit, he says, is harder to articulate, and not quantifiable. It has to do with absorbing stories and their meaning, and making them a part of how you interact with the world.
"Just because I speak English doesn't make me a white man," he said. "Same there. Just because you speak Tlingit doesn't make you a Tlingit"...(more) (1-14-15)

Tináa Art Auction a big success
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
The artwork on view at Saturday night’s Tináa Art Auction at Centennial Hall highlighted the vibrancy and range of what’s been happening recently in the world of Northwest Coast art, while paving the way for a project that will help carry that energy forward into the future. Tináa, Sealaska Heritage Institute’s first-ever art auction, drew a sold-out, black-tie crowd of more than 300 people, who collectively raised more than $300,000 for the Walter Soboleff Center, currently under construction on Front Street downtown. ...(more) (2-3-14)

Faces of Alaska: Rosita Worl
Alaska Public Media
Throughout her life, Dr. Rosita Worl has been an a fighter, an anthropologist and an activist. She has made it her life’s goal to preserve Southeast Alaska Native traditions, while building a collective future for Native people throughout the state. Her early life was full of drama; She has been kidnapped, fled from an arranged marriage, and fought her way though high school. But, Dr. Worl persevered through these hardships and those early memories have remained an important part of her history. Alaska Public Media’s Alexandra Gutierrez sat down with Rosita to talk about her life, and her hopes for the future...( more) (1-2-14)
 

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